Thursday, January 18, 2018

A brain healthy salad

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

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SOURCE: www.georgiapecans.org



BRAIN-HEALTHY RECIPE:

This mindful dish is no boring salad. It appeals to all the senses: beautiful to look at, delicious to taste, a refreshing aroma from dementia-shielding citrus and a satisfying crunch from brain-healthy, antioxidant rich Pecans.



In this recipe, avocados sub for the cheese, while toasted Georgia Pecans sub for the crunch of croutons and flavor hit of bacon (You could even use smoked pecans). 

INGREDIENTS:

For the salad:
1-2 heads bibb lettuce, torn into bite-sized pieces
1 bunch arugula, torn into bite-sized pieces
2 Haas avocados, ripe but firm, peeled and cubed
2 ruby red or pink grapefruits, peeled and segmented, reserve excess juice
½ cup toasted Georgia pecan halves (toasted in a sauté pan)
¼ cup minced fresh parsley.
For the dressing:
2/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/3 cup red wine vinegar
Juice from segmented grapefruit (approx 3 tablespoons)
Fresh ground salt and black pepper to taste. 

PREPARATION:

On large platter arrange the lettuce and arugula.
On the bed of greens arrange the avocado and grapefruit segments.
Combine the ingredients for the dressing and drizzle over the entire salad.
Garnish with toasted Georgia Pecans.
Add final garnish of minced parsley.


Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Pecans for all even if you have dementia

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

SOURCES:
UMASS Lowell
www.georgiapecans.org

Wall Street Journal


Want to eat better and fight dementia? Consider adding pecans to your meals. Here are three great reasons to include pecans in a brain-boosting diet.



1. THE ANTIOXINUT


The University of Massachusetts Lowell studied pecan's effects on the brain, as described in the article, "Pecans Provide Neurological Protection." Antioxidant-rich pecans were shown to be an exceptionally rich source of of Alzheimer's-fighting antioxidants.

Eating pecans along with a variety of fresh fruits, vegetables and wholegrains every day will help ensure a diet high in antioxidants. 

Pecans:
A Brain-Healthy  Treat

Pecans provide neurological protection and are enjoyable on any occasion. An exceptionally rich source of Alzheimer's-fighting antioxidants, natural pecans are available in a variety of ways, from Amazon.com  or your local store.

Browse Pecans >>
Crunchy and delicious, pecans also pack a nutritional punch. Pecans have the highest level of antioxidants among all tree nuts, and are one of the top 20 power foods for antioxidant capacity, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The antioxidant compounds found naturally in pecans include:
  • Vitamin E
  • Ellagic acid
  • Flavonoids
These antioxidants are believed to help prevent disease-causing oxidation in cells which has been linked to developing Alzheimer’s Disease and other types of dementia.

2. FIGHTS FAT

Pecans are also a smart option when it comes to fighting unhealthy, brain-threatening fat. Clinical research from Harvard University School of Public Health suggests that as nut consumption increases, body fat and overall weight actually decreases. In the Harvard study, people following a weight-loss diet that contained 35 percent of calories from fat, including pecans, were able to keep weight off longer than people following a traditionally recommended lower fat diet. 

Nuts are a part of most universally accepted balanced diets, such as the "Mediterranean Diet," which includes fish, poultry, vegetables, fresh and dried fruit, nuts, grains, olives and olive oil. 

Mediterranean Chicken-Pecan Salad

RECIPE:

The Mediterranean Diet has the reputation of being the best way of eating to lower the risk of Alzheimer's. Try this Mediterranean Chicken-Pecan Salad dish rich in cognitive-enhancing saffron and brain-boosting pecans.

MORE BRAIN-HEALTHY RECIPES:

3. FIGHTS CHOLESTEROL

Pecans may also reduce cholesterol. Research from California’s Loma Linda University and New Mexico State University shows levels of so-called “bad” cholesterol (LDL) drop when pecans are part of a daily diet. Pecans get this cholesterol-lowering ability, in part, from the presence of beta-sitosterol, a natural cholesterol-lowering compound. Eating one-and-a-half ounces of pecans a day (27 to 30 pecan halves), as part of a heart-healthy diet, may even reduce the risk of heart disease. 

Pecans make a great addition to every meal. Add them to your morning oatmeal or yogurt, substitute pecans for croutons in lunchtime salads for a flavorful crunch (see our Pecan Salad with Avocado Grapefruit Vinaigrette recipe), or use ground pecans with the seasoning of your choice as delicious breading for meat or fish supper dishes. Any way you chop them, pecans are a tasty addition to just about every recipe! 

THE PECAN MARKET AND ALZHEIMER'S

A Wall Street Journal video and article discusses how "Chinese Demand Reshapes U.S. Pecan Business." Pecan prices have risen dramatically due to demand from China, where it has attained a reputation for many benefits, including protecting against Alzheimer's. 

Antioxidants are well-established promoters of brain health and Alzheimer's prevention. To highlight the antioxidant power of pecans, The Georgia Pecan Commission came up with a creative name when they dubbed pecans the “AntioxiNUT”. This was to bring out that pecans are the most antioxidant-rich tree nut. They rank in the top 15 highest antioxidant capacity foods.

Many brands of pecans have received the American Heart Association’s Heart Check-mark signifying heart healthy status.These include Fisher Pecans and San Saba Pecans.

Pecans are a great gourmet present on any occasion. Natural and neuroprotective, they come in attractive baskets or easy-to-enjoy trays. Amazon.com offers a variety of pecan packages, providing dozens of ways to enjoy brain-healthy pecans with family & friends. 

Says registered dietitian Carolyn O’Neil, “They're not only high in protein, but also in oleic acid, the same type of healthy fat found in olive oil. Enjoying a few as a nutritious snack can help keep hunger at bay so you don't over eat at meals. So enjoy a handful - not a ‘can-ful’.” 


Disclaimer: The Georgia Pecan Commission has no affiliation with Alzheimer's Weekly. The information above is for educational purposes only.

Sunday, January 14, 2018

Why healthy mitochondria could stop Alzheimer's

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Mitochondria are the energy-producing powerhouses of our brain cells. New research discovered that boosting mitochondria defenses enables cells to not only protect themselves, but to also reduce the formation of Alzheimer's plaque. Learn why this breakthrough may succeed where so many other drugs have failed. 



Scientists at EPFL found that rendering mitochondria resistant to damage can halt diseases caused by amyloid toxicity, such as Alzheimer’s disease. The study is published in Nature.

Alzheimer's Plaque is Made out of Beta-Amyloid

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia and neurodegeneration worldwide. A major hallmark of the disease is the accumulation of toxic plaques in the brain, formed by the abnormal aggregation of a protein called beta-amyloid inside neurons.
Still without cure, Alzheimer’s poses a significant burden on public health systems. Most treatments focus on reducing the formation of amyloid plaques, but these approaches have been inconclusive. As a result, scientists are now searching for alternative treatment strategies, one of which is to consider Alzheimer’s as a metabolic disease.

Boosting Defenses

Taking this line of thought, Johan Auwerx’s lab at EPFL looked at mitochondria, which are the energy-producing powerhouses of cells, and thus central in metabolism. Using worms and mice as models, they discovered that boosting mitochondria defenses against a particular form of protein stress, enables them to not only protect themselves, but to also reduce the formation of amyloid plaques.
During normal aging and age-associated diseases such as Alzheimer’s, cells face increasing damage and struggle to protect and replace dysfunctional mitochondria. Since mitochondria provide energy to brain cells, leaving them unprotected in Alzheimer’s disease favors brain damage, giving rise to symptoms like memory loss over the years.
The scientists identified two mechanisms that control the quality of mitochondria: First, the “mitochondrial unfolded protein response” (UPRmt), which protects mitochondria from stress stimuli. Second, mitophagy, a process that recycles defective mitochondria. Both these mechanisms are the key to delaying or preventing excessive mitochondrial damage during disease.

Defense & Recycle Pathways

While we have known for a while that mitochondria are dysfunctional in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, this is the first evidence that they actually try to fight the disease by boosting quality control pathways. “These defense and recycle pathways of the mitochondria are essential in organisms, from the worm C. elegans all the way to humans,” says Vincenzo Sorrentino, first author of the paper. “So we decided to pharmacologically activate them.”
The team started by testing well-established compounds, such as the antibiotic doxycycline and the vitamin nicotinamide riboside (NR), which can turn on the UPRmt and mitophagy defense systems in a worm model (C. elegans) of Alzheimer’s disease. The health, performance and lifespan of worms exposed to the drugs increased remarkably compared with untreated worms. Plaque formation was also significantly reduced in the treated animals.
Mitochondria
Whole-brain hemisphere sections of Alzheimer’s mice, the model APP/PSEN1, before and after treatment with the NAD+ booster Nicotinamide riboside (NR). The beta-amyloid plaque content in the brain of the APP/PSEN1 mice (left), clearly visible by Thioflavin S staining in green color and associated to brain damage during the disease, is reduced after 10 weeks treatment with NR (right). Credit: Vincenzo Sorrentino, Mario Romani, Francesca Potenza/EPFL.
And most significantly, the scientists observed similar improvements when they turned on the same mitochondrial defense pathways in cultured human neuronal cells, using the same drugs.

Significant Improvement

The encouraging results led the researchers to test NR in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. Just like C. elegans, the mice saw a significant improvement of mitochondrial function and a reduction in the number of amyloid plaques. But most importantly, the scientists observed a striking normalization of the cognitive function in the mice. This has tremendous implications from a clinical perspective.
According to Johan Auwerx, tackling Alzheimer’s through mitochondria could make all the difference. “So far, Alzheimer’s disease has been considered to be mostly the consequence of the accumulation of amyloid plaques in the brain,” he says. “We have shown that restoring mitochondrial health reduces plaque formation – but, above all, it also improves brain function, which is the ultimate objective of all Alzheimer’s researchers and patients.”
The strategy provides a novel therapeutic approach to slow down the progression of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease, and possibly even in other disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, which is also characterized by profound mitochondrial and metabolic defects.
The approach remains to be tested in human patients. “By targeting mitochondria, NR and other molecules that stimulate their ‘defense and recycle’ systems could perhaps succeed where so many drugs, most of which aim to decrease amyloid plaque formation, have failed,” says Vincenzo Sorrentino.
Contributors

  • Michigan State University
  • EPFL Proteomics Core Facility

Friday, January 12, 2018

Why the Mediterranean diet is good for memory

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

EurekAlert

18 diet studies showed the Mediterranean Diet improved cognition and fought Alzheimer's in countries around the world. No matter what your age, see why the Mediterranean Diet can help keep your brain healthy. 




Eating a Mediterranean diet can slow down cognitive decline.

The diet can improve your mind (as well your heart), shows a study published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Nutrition

Continued below video...

Following a Mediterranean diet was shown to be associated with slower rates of cognitive decline, reduced conversion to Alzheimer's, and improvements in cognitive function.

The main foods in the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) include plant foods, such as leafy greens, fresh fruit and vegetables, cereals, beans, seeds, nuts, and legumes. The MedDiet is also low in dairy, has minimal red meat, and uses olive oil as its major source of fat.

Leading author Roy Hardman from the Centre for Human Psychopharmacology Swinburne University of Technology Melbourne Australia and his colleagues evaluated all the available papers between 2000-2015 that investigated if and how a MedDiet may impact cognitive processes over time. In total, 18 out of the 135 articles met their strict inclusion criteria.

"The most surprising result was that the positive effects were found in countries around the whole world. So regardless of being located outside of what is considered the Mediterranean region, the positive cognitive effects of a higher adherence to a MedDiet were similar in all evaluated papers;" he said.

Attention, memory, and language improved. Memory, in particular, was positively affected by the MedDiet including improvements in: delayed recognition, long-term, and working memory, executive function, and visual constructs.

"Why is a higher adherence to the MedDiet related to slowing down the rate of cognitive decline? The MedDiet offers the opportunity to change some of the modifiable risk factors," he explained.

"These include reducing inflammatory responses, increasing micronutrients, improving vitamin and mineral imbalances, changing lipid profiles by using olive oils as the main source of dietary fats, maintaining weight and potentially reducing obesity, improving polyphenols in the blood, improving cellular energy metabolism and maybe changing the gut micro-biota, although this has not been examined to a larger extent yet."

Moreover, the benefits to cognition afforded by the MedDiet were not exclusive to older individuals. Two of the included studies focused on younger adults and they both found improvements in cognition using computerized assessments.

The researchers stress that research in this area is important due to the expected extensive population aging over the next 20-30 years. They envision that the utilization of a dietary pattern, such as the MedDiet, will be an essential tool to maintain quality of life and reduce the potential social and economic burdens of manifested cognitive declines like dementia.

"I would therefore recommend people to try to adhere or switch to a MedDiet, even at an older age," Hardman added.

Like many researchers, Hardman takes his research home: "I follow the diet patterns and do not eat any red meats, chicken or pork. I have fish two-three times per week and adhere to a Mediterranean style of eating."


Wednesday, January 10, 2018

high blood sugar and Alzheimer's

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

SOURCE:

SUGAR'S TIPPING POINT: Molecular links between blood sugar and Alzheimer’s were established by scientists. They show how excess blood sugar damages a vital enzyme involved with early-stage Alzheimer’s. Learn more about sugar & Alzheimer's. 




Abnormally high blood sugar (also called glucose) levels, or hyperglycaemia, is well-known as a characteristic of diabetes and obesity, but its link to Alzheimer’s disease is less familiar. 

Diabetes patients have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease compared to healthy individuals. In Alzheimer’s disease abnormal proteins aggregate to form plaques and tangles in the brain which progressively damage the brain and lead to severe cognitive decline. 

Scientists already knew that glucose and its break-down products can damage proteins in cells via a reaction called glycation but the specific molecular link between glucose and Alzheimer’s was not understood. 

But now scientists from the University of Bath Departments of Biology and Biochemistry, Chemistry and Pharmacy and Pharmacology, working with colleagues at the Wolfson Centre for Age Related Diseases, King’s College London, have unraveled that link. 

By studying brain samples from people with and without Alzheimer’s using a sensitive technique to detect glycation, the team discovered that in the early stages of Alzheimer’s glycation damages an enzyme called MIF (macrophage migration inhibitory factor) which plays a role in immune response and insulin regulation. 

MIF is involved in the response of brain cells called glia to the build-up of abnormal proteins in the brain during Alzheimer’s disease, and the researchers believe that inhibition and reduction of MIF activity caused by glycation could be the ‘tipping point’ in disease progression. It appears that as Alzheimer’s progresses, glycation of these enzymes increases. 

The study is published in the journal Scientific Reports. 

Professor Jean van den Elsen, from the University of Bath Department of Biology and Biochemistry, said: “We’ve shown that this enzyme is already modified by glucose in the brains of individuals at the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. We are now investigating if we can detect similar changes in blood. 

“Normally MIF would be part of the immune response to the build-up of abnormal proteins in the brain, and we think that because sugar damage reduces some MIF functions and completely inhibits others that this could be a tipping point that allows Alzheimer’s to develop. 

Dr. Rob Williams, also from the Department of Biology and Biochemistry, added: “Knowing this will be vital to developing a chronology of how Alzheimer’s progresses and we hope will help us identify those at risk of Alzheimer’s and lead to new treatments or ways to prevent the disease. 


Dr. Omar Kassaar, from the University of Bath, added: “Excess sugar is well known to be bad for us when it comes to diabetes and obesity, but this potential link with Alzheimer’s disease is yet another reason that we should be controlling our sugar intake in our diets.”

MORE INFORMATION:
  • The study is a collaboration between Dr Rob Williams and Prof Jean van den Elsen in the Department of Biology & Biochemistry, Prof Tony James in the Department of Chemistry and Prof Stephen Ward in the Department of Pharmacy & Pharmacology.
  • It was funded by the Dunhill Medical Trust. Human brain tissue for this study was provided through Brains for Dementia Research, a joint initiative between Alzheimer’s Society and Alzheimer’s Research UK in association with the Medical Research Council.

Monday, January 8, 2018

Alzheimer's a cold-weather danger

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]
SOURCE: 


WEATHER ALERT - 9 WAYS TO STAY SAFE WITH DEMENTIA: People can lose body heat fast. That's called hypothermia. Big chills and Alzheimer's are one dangerous combination. Learn 9 ways to stay safe in cold weather.




Losing too much body heat is a serious problem called hypothermia (hi-po-ther-mee-uh).

Protect people with with dementia from hypothermia during those months when it's cold outside. Check out these tips on how to stay safe. Share it with your family and friends.

WHAT IS HYPOTHERMIA?

Hypothermia is what happens when your body temperature gets very low. For an older person, a body temperature colder than 95 degrees can cause many health problems, such as a heart attack, kidney problems, liver damage, or worse.

Being outside in the cold, or even being in a very cold house, can lead to hypothermia. You can take steps to lower your chance of getting hypothermia.

KEEP WARM INSIDE

Living in a cold house, apartment, or other building can cause hypothermia. People who are sick may have special problems keeping warm. Do not let it get too cold inside and dress warmly.

9 Tips for keeping warm inside:

  1. Set your heat at 68 degrees or higher.
  2. To save on heating bills, close off rooms you are not using.
  3. To keep warm at home, wear long johns under your clothes.
  4. Throw a blanket over your legs.
  5. Wear socks and slippers.
  6. When you go to sleep, wear long johns under your pajamas, and use extra covers.
  7. Wear a cap or hat.
  8. Ask family or friends to check on you during cold weather.
  9. Bundle up on windy, cool days

STAY WARM OUTSIDE

A heavy wind can quickly lower your body temperature. Check the weather forecast for windy and cold days. On those days, try to stay inside or in a warm place. If you have to go out, wear warm clothes.

Tips for bundling up:

  1. Dress for the weather if you have to go out on chilly, cold, or damp days.
  2. Wear loose layers of clothing. The air between the layers helps to keep you warm.
  3. Put on a hat and scarf. You lose a lot of body heat when your head and neck are uncovered.
  4. Wear a waterproof coat or jacket if it's snowy.

ASK YOUR DOCTOR

Talk with your doctor about how to stay safe in cold weather. Some illnesses may make it harder for your body to stay warm. Taking some medicines and not being active also can affect body heat. Your doctor can help you find ways to prevent hypothermia.

Tips for talking with your doctor about hypothermia:

  1. Ask your doctor about signs of hypothermia.
  2. Talk to your doctor about any health problems (such as diabetes) and medicines that can make hypothermia a special problem for you.
  3. Ask about safe ways to stay active even when it's cold outside.

WARNING SIGNS OF HYPOTHERMIA

Sometimes it is hard to tell if a person has hypothermia. Look for clues. 
  • Is the house very cold?
  • Is the person not dressed for cold weather?
  • Is the person speaking slower than normal?
  • Is the person having trouble keeping his or her balance?
Watch for the signs of hypothermia in yourself, too. You might become confused if your body temperature gets very low. Talk to your family and friends about the warning signs so they can look out for you. 

EARLY SIGNS OF HYPOTHERMIA:

  • cold feet and hands
  • puffy or swolen face
  • pale skin
  • shivering
  • slower than normal speech or slurring of words
  • acting sleepy
  • being angry or confused

LATER SIGNS OF HYPOTHERMIA:

  • moving slowly, trouble walking, or being clumsy
  • stiff and jerky arm or leg movements
  • slow heartbeat
  • slow, shallow breathing
  • blacking out or losing consciousness

CALLING 911

Call 911 right away if you think someone has warning signs of hypothermia.

Tips for what to do after you call 911

  • Wrap the person in a warm blanket.
  • Do not rub the person's legs or arms.
  • Do not try to warm the person in a bath.
  • Do not use a heating pad.

FAQS

Your questions answered:

Q. What health problems can make it hard for my body to stay warm?

A. Diabetes, thyroid problems, Parkinson's disease, and arthritis are common problems for older people. These health concerns can make it harder for your body to stay warm. Talk to your doctor about your health problems and hypothermia. Your doctor can tell you how to stay warm even when it's cold outside.

Q. Can medicines lower my body's temperature?

A. Yes. Some medicines used by older people can make it easy to get hypothermia. These include medicines you get
from your doctor and those you buy over-the-counter. Talk to your doctor before you stop taking any medicine.

Q. What can I do to stay warm at home?

A. Try closing off any room you are not using. Also:

  • Close the vents and shut the doors in these rooms.
  • Place a rolled towel in front of all doors to keep out drafts.
  • Make sure your house isn't losing heat through windows.
  • Keep your blinds and curtains closed.
  • If you have gaps around the windows, try using weather stripping or caulk to keep the cold air out.
  • And, it helps to wear warm clothes during the day and use extra blankets at night.
Q. Can I get any help with my heating bills?

A. You may be able to get help paying your heating bill. You can call the National Energy Assistance Referral service at 1-866-674-6327 to get information about the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program. It's a free call. If you have a computer with internet, you can also email them at:
energyassistance@ncat.org.

SUMMARY — WHAT YOU CAN DO ABOUT HYPOTHERMIA

  1. Set your heat at 68 degrees or higher.
  2. Dress warmly on cold days even if you are staying in the house.
  3. Wear loose layers when you go outside on chilly days.
  4. Wear a hat, scarf, and gloves.
  5. Don't stay out in the cold and wind for a long time.
  6. Talk to your doctor about health problems that may make it harder for you to keep warm.
  7. Find safe ways to stay active even when it's cold outside.
  8. Ask a neighbor or friend to check on you if you live alone.
  9. If you think someone has hypothermia:
    • Call 911 right away.
    • Cover him or her with a blanket.
    • Don't rub his or her legs or arms.

WHERE TO FIND MORE INFORMATION

For information about help in your area, check with your local Area Agency on Aging. Look in your phone book or contact:
Eldercare Locator
Phone: 1-800-677-1116 (toll-free)
Website: www.eldercare.gov

For help with heating bills, contact the National Energy Assistance Referral service about the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program:
National Energy Assistance Referral Hotline
Phone: 1-866-674-6327 (toll-free)
TTY: 1-866-367-6228 (toll-free)
Website: www.liheap.ncat.org/profiles/energyhelp.htm

For more about health and aging, contact:
National Institute on Aging Information Center
P.O. Box 8057
Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8057
Phone: 1-800-222-2225 (toll-free)
TTY: 1-800-222-4225 (toll-free)
Website: www.nia.nih.gov/health
Spanish website: www.nia.nih.gov/Espanol

Visit NIHSeniorHealth.gov (www.nihseniorhealth.gov), a senior-friendly website from the National Institute on Aging and the National Library of Medicine. This website has health and wellness information for older adults. Special features make it simple to use. 

Share this with friends and family so they can learn the signs of hypothermia and how to prevent it.



This free booklet is provided by:
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institute on Aging

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