Monday, November 19, 2018

Anti-dementia recipe

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Mediterranean Diet Wiki
Chef MD


Dementia-fighting folate abounds in this butternut-squash Mediterranean-Diet dish. Spiced with neuroprotective curry and soaked in stroke-preventing green tea, it packs a triple-punch of brain benefits. (Includes references to studies.) 


Ingredients

  • 3 green tea teabags
  • 1 cup quick-cooking pearled barley
  • 3 cups ½-inch diced butternut squash (12 ounces)
  • 2 teaspoons Madras curry powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup crumbled goat cheese
  • 1/4 cup sliced unblanched almonds, toasted

Directions

  1. Boil 3 cups of water with green tea bags.
  2. Turn off heat and let tea bags steep for 5 minutes.
  3. Remove and discard tea bags.
  4. Meanwhile, toast barley in a dry sauté pan or deep skillet over medium-high heat 2 to 3 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  5. Add squash, 1 cup of the tea, curry and salt.
  6. Simmer for 3-4 minutes until tea is absorbed.
  7. Stir frequently.
  8. Add additional tea by cupfuls, simmering until tea is absorbed before adding additional liquid. This should take 12 to 14 minutes.
  9. When barley and squash are tender and all tea has been incorporated, remove from heat.
  10. Stir in goat cheese until melted and creamy.
  11. Serve and top with almonds.

Saturday, November 17, 2018

Alzheimer's-What is the best way to fight it?t

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two



A growing body of research shows there are many ways to lower Alzheimer's risk. What are they? Which one is best? See what Cleveland Clinic's Aging Survey revealed.

Thirty men and women ages 59-69 were put through treadmill fitness assessments and ultrasounds of the heart. Then they received brain scans to look for blood flow to certain areas of the brain. 

"We set out to characterize the relationship between heart function, fitness, and cerebral blood flow, which no other study had explored to date," Johnson said. "In other words, if you're in good physical shape, does that improve blood flow to critical areas of the brain? And does that improved blood flow provide some form of protection from dementia?" 

The results showed blood flow to critical areas of the brain - and so the supply of oxygen and vital nutrients - was higher in those who were more physically fit. 

In layman's terms, this study demonstrates that regular exercise at any age could keep the mind young, according to Johnson. 

"Can we prove irrefutably that increased fitness will prevent Alzheimer's disease? Not at this point," Johnson said. "But this is an important first step towards demonstrating that being physically active improves blood flow to the brain and confers some protection from dementia, and conversely that people who live sedentary lifestyles, especially those who are genetically predisposed to Alzheimer's, might be more susceptible." 

Since people who exercise frequently often have reduced arterial stiffness, Johnson and his group postulate that regular physical activity - regardless of age - maintains the integrity of the "pipes" that carry blood to the brain. 

"In the mid-late 20th century, much of the research into dementias like Alzheimer's focused on vascular contributions to disease, but the discovery of amyloid plaques and tangles took prevailing research in a different direction" Johnson said. "Research like this heralds a return to the exploration of the ways the vascular system contributes to the disease process." 


SOURCE:
  • Cleveland Clinic
  • Johnson's research, which was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health CTSA (UL1TR000117) and the University of Kentucky's Clinical Services Core, was published in NeuroImage.

Friday, November 9, 2018

Dementia-does vitamin E improve lives

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Vitamin E may slow down Alzheimer's and ease caregiving, according to a JAMA report. See how vitamin E improved daily activities in dementia, including shopping, preparing meals, planning and traveling. 




Difficulty with activities of daily living often affect Alzheimer's patients. Disruption to daily routine is one of the hardest burdens for caregivers. New research suggests that Vitamin E may slow functional decline in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease. This includes problems with daily activities such as:

  • Shopping
  • Preparing meals
  • Planning
  • Traveling
It appears to also decrease caregiver burden. There was no added benefit for memory and cognitive testing with the vitamin.

The research was performed by the faculty of Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinaiworking with Veterans Administration Medical Centers. The study is published online in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The researchers investigated vitamin E as α-Tocopherol, an important fat-soluble antioxidant. Mary Sano, PhD, was the trial co-investigator, and professor in the department of psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and director of research at the James J. Peters Veteran's Administration Medical Center, Bronx, New York. She said,

"Since the cholinesterase inhibitors [Aricept/donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine], we have had very little to offer patients with mild-to-moderate dementia."

"This trial showed that vitamin E delays progression of functional decline by 19% per year, which translates into 6.2 months benefit over placebo."
The finding is valuable because vitamin E is easy to purchase at local drugstores and it is also inexpensive. The clinical trial investigators believe it can be recommended as a treatment strategy, based on the double-blind randomized controlled trial.

The Veteran's Administration Cooperative Randomized Trial of Vitamin E and memantine in Alzheimer's Disease (TEAM-AD examined the effects of vitamin E 2,000 IU/d, 20 mg/d of memantine, the combination, or placebo on Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study/Activities of Daily Living (ADCS-ADL) Inventory Score. Cognitive, neuropsychiatric, functional, and caregiver measures were secondary outcomes. A group of 613 patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease were in the study, which was launched in August 2007 and finished in September 2012 at 14 Veterans Affairs Medical Centers. 

Dr. Sano previously led a study on Vitamin E in patients with moderately severe Alzheimer's disease. She found that the vitamin slowed disease progression in this group of patients as well.


Mount Sinai Medical Center, via Newswise.

Journal Reference:
  1. Maurice W. Dysken, Mary Sano, Sanjay Asthana, Julia E. Vertrees, Muralidhar Pallaki, Maria Llorente, Susan Love, Gerard D. Schellenberg, J. Riley McCarten, Julie Malphurs, Susana Prieto, Peijun Chen, David J. Loreck, George Trapp, Rajbir S. Bakshi, Jacobo E. Mintzer, Judith L. Heidebrink, Ana Vidal-Cardona, Lillian M. Arroyo, Angel R. Cruz, Sally Zachariah, Neil W. Kowall, Mohit P. Chopra, Suzanne Craft, Stephen Thielke, Carolyn L. Turvey, Catherine Woodman, Kimberly A. Monnell, Kimberly Gordon, Julie Tomaska, Yoav Segal, Peter N. Peduzzi, Peter D. Guarino. Effect of Vitamin E and Memantine on Functional Decline in Alzheimer DiseaseJAMA, 2014; 311 (1): 33 DOI:10.1001/jama.2013.282834


Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Alzheimer's persons need the right amount of coconut oil

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two



Dr. Newport's book on Alzheimer's, Coconut Oil & Ketones


MCT oil generates ketones, which can help dementia. Coconut oil is rich in MCT oil. What are healthier food sources? How much is a good daily amount to get the maximum benefit?

Use the following table to make practical conversions:
TablespoonsMillilitersTeaspoons
1 tablespoon =15 milliters =3 teaspoons
1/3 tablespoon =5 milliters =1 teaspoon

Dr. Newport's Treatment for Her Husband

The following is not medical advice. Be sure to consult your physician before trying this yourself. 
  1. You may start with one teaspoon of coconut oil in each meal.
  2. If available, use a mixture of 1/2 coconut oil and 1/2 MCT oil.
  3. Increase the amount gradually, protecting against side effects.
  4. Try to get as much as 3 tablespoons per meal and two tablespoons at bedtime.
For the full one-hour video that covers coconut oil and Alzheimer's in depth, check out Dr. Newport's full-length lecture at TheIHMC: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=feyydeMFWy4 

Dr. Newport's book on Alzheimer's, Coconut Oil & Ketones

Monday, November 5, 2018

In dementia care-How to tum a no into a yes

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire




Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Senior care

A common Alzheimer's frustration is the propensity to say "no" to just about everything. Often, it happens when changes in the brain make it hard to understand many questions. See how these tips may help turn that "no" into a "yes". 

Watch this videohttps://youtu.be/gspFp75Uf1k


Saturday, November 3, 2018

Memory-Mood Boosted by Curcumin

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


UCLA 
The paper’s authors, in addition to Small, are Prabha Siddarth, Dr. Zhaoping Li, Karen Miller, Linda Ercoli, Natacha Emerson, Jacqueline Martinez, Koon-Pong Wong, Jie Liu, Dr. David Merrill, Dr. Stephen Chen, Susanne Henning, Nagichettiar Satyamurthy, Sung-Cheng Huang, Dr. David Heber and Jorge Barrio, all of UCLA.


Turmeric spice contains curcumin. In a new UCLA study, curcumin significantly improved memory and mildly improved mood in people with memory problems. 




Lovers of Indian food, give yourselves a second helping: Daily consumption of a certain form of curcumin — the substance that gives Indian curry its bright color — improved memory and mood in people with mild, age-related memory loss, according to the results of a study conducted by UCLA researchers.

Curcumin, Memory & Alzheimer's

The research, published online in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, examined the effects of an easily absorbed curcumin supplement on memory performance in people without dementia, as well as curcumin’s potential impact on the microscopic plaques and tangles in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease.

Leigh Hopper/UCLA Health
Dr. Gary Small
Found in turmeric, curcumin has previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties in lab studies. It also has been suggested as a possible reason that senior citizens in India, where curcumin is a dietary staple, have a lower prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease and better cognitive performance.

“Exactly how curcumin exerts its effects is not certain, but it may be due to its ability to reduce brain inflammation, which has been linked to both Alzheimer’s disease and major depression,” said Dr. Gary Small, director of geriatric psychiatry at UCLA’s Longevity Center and of the geriatric psychiatry division at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, and the study’s first author.

90 Milligrams of Curcumin

The double-blind, placebo-controlled study involved 40 adults between the ages of 50 and 90 years who had mild memory complaints. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either a placebo or 90 milligrams of curcumin twice daily for 18 months.
  
All 40 subjects received standardized cognitive assessments at the start of the study and at six-month intervals, and monitoring of curcumin levels in their blood at the start of the study and after 18 months. Thirty of the volunteers underwent positron emission tomography, or PET scans, to determine the levels of amyloid and tau in their brains at the start of the study and after 18 months.

Significant Improvements in Memory & Attention

The people who took curcumin experienced significant improvements in their memory and attention abilities, while the subjects who received placebo did not, Small said. In memory tests, the people taking curcumin improved by 28 percent over the 18 months. Those taking curcumin also had mild improvements in mood, and their brain PET scans showed significantly less amyloid and tau signals in the amygdala and hypothalamus than those who took placebos.

The amygdala and hypothalamus are regions of the brain that control several memory and emotional functions.

Four people taking curcumin, and two taking placebos, experienced mild side effects such as abdominal pain and nausea.

Relatively Safe Form of Curcumin

The researchers plan to conduct a follow-up study with a larger number of people. That study will include some people with mild depression so the scientists can explore whether curcumin also has antidepressant effects. The larger sample also would allow them to analyze whether curcumin’s memory-enhancing effects vary according to people’s genetic risk for Alzheimer’s, their age or the extent of their cognitive problems.

“These results suggest that taking this relatively safe form of curcumin could provide meaningful cognitive benefits over the years,” said Small, UCLA’s Parlow–Solomon Professor on Aging.


SOURCE:
  • UCLA
    The paper’s authors, in addition to Small, are Prabha Siddarth, Dr. Zhaoping Li, Karen Miller, Linda Ercoli, Natacha Emerson, Jacqueline Martinez, Koon-Pong Wong, Jie Liu, Dr. David Merrill, Dr. Stephen Chen, Susanne Henning, Nagichettiar Satyamurthy, Sung-Cheng Huang, Dr. David Heber and Jorge Barrio, all of UCLA.

    The study was supported by the Ahmanson Foundation, the Marshall and Margherite McComb Foundation, the McMahan Foundation, Bob and Marion Wilson, the Fran and Ray Stark Foundation Fund for Alzheimer’s Disease Research, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health.

    Theravalues Corp. provided the curcumin and placebos for the trial, as well as funds for laboratory testing and for Small’s travel to present preliminary findings at the 2017 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference.

Thursday, November 1, 2018

Alzheimer's Caregiver's Prayer

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


SOURCE:
(c) Frena Gray-Davidson
Author of "Alzheimer's 911"
Help, Hope, and Healing for the Caregiver

I'm going to need a lot of help
to become a good caregiver.
I'm counting on you, God, for that.

Help me grow patience for this journey.
Help me forgive myself for all the ways I fail.

Show me how to see that heart within
that longs for unconditional love,
just like me.
Show me how to know that soul
that shines in the light of divine love,
just like mine.
Show me myself in this person.
Show me this person in me.

Help me listen to a thousand repetitions
without getting angry.
Help me to say, "Uh-Huh," instead of
"I already told you that!"
Help me not be frightened or repelled
by a grown-up needing guidance
and help like a child.

Help me laugh when
I find sheets in the oven,
socks on hands,
underwear over pants,
someone undressed and back in bed
I just spent an hour getting up.

Help me be kind, to myslef and others.
To say, "Oh well!" when I lose my temper.
To say, "I'm sorry" when I owe it,
To say, "Never mind" and mean it,
To say, "Oops" and not scold.
Help me remind myself that,
next to the end of civilization as we know it,
this really isn't so much.

Help me forgive this person's illness.
Help me forgive my lack of empathy.
Help me remind myself that
I don't have to be perfect
and, as you know, God,
that's a good thing,
considering.

Help me to journey to the place where
it's enough to be the people we both are.

Help me be amused instead of judgemental.
Help me stop blaming someone for their illness.
Help me be kind
instead of angry and frightened.
Help me give more than I ever got.
Help me grow into the person
who can love everyone exactly as they are,
including me.

Help me be willing
to become my parent's parent
instead of resisting with anger.

Help me learn how to have fn,
how to travel into different time zones
with my parent
who thinks this is 1928 in South Dakota.

Help me understand
that when my 88-year-old mother
asks me when her mother is coming home
it means she needs a mother.
Help me be that mother.

Help me think about the fact
that sometimes everyone feels
like a motherless child.
Help me feel that gap.

Help me know and understand that
as I become what others need
I become that for myself.
I'd be really grateful, Lord,
if you could do all that for me really fast.
Or maybe at least,
you could rush me some patience.

Thank you.


SOURCE:
(c) Frena Gray-Davidson
Author of "Alzheimer's 911"
Help, Hope, and Healing for the Caregiver

Fitness is important in dementia prevention. Click below for more info