Saturday, September 23, 2017

Positives of dementia

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



Dr. Gregory Jicha has completed an eye-opening study on diagnosing dementia. He said, "The overall assumption is that this diagnosis would have a uniformly negative impact on a patient's outlook on life, but we were surprised to find that almost half of respondents reported positive scores." Learn the benefits people see in getting their diagnosis. 



Results from a study of patients with a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment or early dementia indicates that their outlook isn't as dark as expected. 

A group of scientists from the University of Kentucky's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging asked 48 men and women with early dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) a series of questions about their quality of life and personal outlook post-diagnosis. 

Called the Silver Lining Questionnaire (SLQ), the instrument measures the extent to which people believe their illness has had a positive benefit in areas such as: improved personal relationships, greater appreciation for life, positive influence on others, personal inner strength and changes in life philosophy. The SLQ has been administered previously to patients with cancer diagnoses, but hasn't been given to MCI/dementia patients, according to Gregory Jicha, MD, PhD, a professor at the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging and the study's lead author. 

"The overall assumption is that this diagnosis would have a uniformly negative impact on a patient's outlook on life, but we were surprised to find that almost half of respondents reported positive scores," Jicha said.

Even Higher

Positive responses were even higher on certain scores, such as:
  1. appreciation and acceptance of life
  2. less concern about failure
  3. self-reflection, tolerance of others, and courage to face problems in life
  4. strengthened relationships and new opportunities to meet people.
"The common stereotype for this type of diagnosis is depression, denial, and despair," Jicha said. "However, this study - while small - suggests that positive changes in attitude are as common as negative ones." 

The next step, according to Jicha, is to explore the variables that affect outlook in these patients with an eye towards interventions that might help the other half find their "silver lining." 

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Coconut oil dementia diet

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Coconut oil for Alzheimer's is based on the well-researched benefits of ketone-rich diets in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, Vascular and Lewy Body Dementia. Learn about the Coconut-Oil-Dementia Diet, a rich source of ketones & other brain-healthy nutrients.




Welcome to our series investigating dementia and the science behind the brain's use of ketones. This series offers much well-referenced information but is not medical advice. Before using any of this information, ask your doctor.

A coconut-oil-dementia diet focuses on foods that are rich in ingredients that help the body make ketones, as well as other brain-healthy nutrients that fight dementia. Here is how it works.

Glucose

Glucose is our brains' primary energy source. Like an athlete too weak to run due to hunger, a brain with too little glucose can experience cognitive decline. That means a person will have problems thinking and remembering.

As our brains age, they "burn" glucose less efficiently. Furthermore, research has shown that a drop in glucose metabolism usually occurs in people with dementias such as Alzheimer's. This glucose-drop often occurs years before people begin to exhibit symptoms.

To address this problem, scientists began studying ketones as an alternative energy source to glucose.

Ketones

In 2008, the medical journal "Neurotherapeutics" published the study, Ketone Bodies as a Therapeutic for Alzheimer's Disease. The groundbreaking research demonstrated the brain's apparent ability to use ketones as an alternative energy source.

With this new evidence regarding ketones' benefits for the ailing brain, scientists began taking a closer look at the "Ketogenic Diet." The ketogenic diet activates the "ketosis" process in our bodies, generating these energy-giving ketones.

Brain Studies on Ketones

Indeed, researchers found the ketogenic diet to have neuroprotective effects, breathing new life into brain cells. In uncontrolled clinical trials and animal studies, the ketogenic diet provided "symptomatic and disease-modifying activity in a broad range of neurodegenerative disorders."(1) This includes:
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Stroke (Vascular dementia) (1)
  • Huntington's Disease(2)
  • Lewy Body Dementia(3)
Further research strengthened the evidence in such studies as the one showing that the Ketogenic Diet improves dementia in mice.

Even more recently, the University of South Florida (USF) Byrd Alzheimer Institute launched a clinical trial of coconut oil in 65 people with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease. It is currently in progress as of June 2013.

Axona®

The ketogenic diet is complex. It usually requires supervision by a professional nutritionist. This is worth the effort when it is administered for its proven benefits for epileptics. However, for people living at home with dementia, it can be too demanding. When not strictly supervised or adhered to, it can have undesirable side effects.

To make its benefits more accessible to the millions of people with dementias such as Alzheimer's, the biotechnology company Accera introduced Axona®.

Axona® is a brand-name high-quality FDA-recognized prescription-only medical food. It comes in clean, easy-to-use one-a-day packets. For those who can afford it, clinical trials have shown it to be a promising supplement. At about a hundred dollars a month, though, it is not for everyone.

MCT

The ketogenic diet's process of ketosis is not the only way to get helpful ketones to the brain. When a person eats or drinks anything rich in MCTs (Medium Chain Triglycerides), the liver quickly converts them into ketones, which make their way to the brain in just an hour or two.

Sources rich in MCTs include MCT oil, coconut oil and Axona®. It is well worth exploring the least expensive concentrated source of dietary MCTs, coconut oil.

Coconut Oil

Virgin coconut oil is available at health food stores, food co-ops, Amazon.com and many grocery stores. It is inexpensive and contains about 60 percent MCTs.

The most famous advocate of coconut oil for dementia is Dr. Mary Newport. Dr. Newport almost gave up hope on treating her husband's Alzheimer's. After doing her own research, she began giving him a daily dose of coconut oil. He showed immediate improvement. 

In 2008, she started carefully documenting her husband Steve's progress. After two years of regular use, she carefully documented that he:

  • improved dramatically
  • jogged once more
  • read again and remembered what he read
  • got distracted less
  • had a stable MRI for the entire two-year period.
Dr. Newport said at the time,
"I do believe that, overall, the use of coconut oil has taken us back in time at least two years. I don't know if we will beat it, but we have at least gotten a reprieve from this disease."
See the interview of Dr. Mary Newport on her Research on Treating Alzheimer's with Coconut Oil.

Update

In 2014, under the video, "How Much Coconut Oil for Alzheimer's & Dementia?", Dr. Newport wrote:
"About one year ago, Steve began having seizures which occur in about 1/3 of Alzheimer's patients eventually...not related to coconut oil. He fell straight back and hit his head with the first seizures. I wouldn't trade the extra three or so better quality years we had as a result of coconut oil even if Alzheimer's wins in the end. I have personally heard from about 400 people who have benefited, most with dementia, at least 35 with Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative disorders, some now stable for two to four years. It is a dietary intervention... it is your choice."
Coconut oil dissolves easily in anything from coffee to hot breakfast cereal. Check out, 20 Ways to Mix Coconut Oil into a Dementia Diet.

Coconut oil is an ordinary food that does not need a prescription. Notwithstanding, taking a lot of anything can have side-effects or interactions, so be sure to ask your doctor. , dementia views, dementia resource

For a practical guide to the use of coconut oil and MCT oil in dementias such as Alzheimer's, see the video, How to Use Coconut Oil for Dementia

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Is it dementia

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

University of Gothenburg

Memory failing? New research shows you may need help, but not for dementia. Memory slips, stress and fatigue are the symptoms of a growing population of people with healthy memory. Learn why. 




Stress, fatigue, and feeling like your memory is failing you... These are the symptoms of a growing group of patients studied as part of a thesis at Sahlgrenska Academy. Result -- They may need help, but they are rarely entering the initial stages of dementia.

GROWING NUMBERS

"We are seeing a growing number of people who are seeking help because of self-perceived cognitive problems, but have no objective signs of disease despite thorough investigation," says Marie Eckerström, doctoral student at the Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology and licensed psychologist at the Memory Unit of Sahlgrenska University Hospital. 

The influx of this particular group of patients, which currently represents one-third of the individuals who come to the unit, has increased the need for knowledge of who they are. In her work, Marie Eckerström followed a few hundred of them, both women and men, over an average of four years.

Memory Intact

They are usually highly educated professionals who are relatively young in this context, between the ages of 50 and 60. When tested at the hospital, their memory functions are intact. But, in their everyday environment where they are under pressure to constantly learn new things, they think things just are not working right. 

The correlation between self-perceived memory problems and stress proved to be strong. Seven out of ten in the group had experiences of severe stress, clinical burnout, or depression. 

"We found that problems with stress were very common. Patients often tell us they are living or have lived with severe stress for a prolonged period of time and this has affected their cognitive functions to such an extent that they feel like they are sick and are worried about it. In some cases, this is combined with a close family member with dementia, giving the patient more knowledge but also increasing their concern," says Marie Eckerström.

Suspected Dementia

The memory unit investigates suspicions of the early stages of dementia in those who seek help. Research is conducted in parallel to this. 

"We primarily investigate suspected dementia. If we are able to rule this out, then the patient does not remain with us. But, there are not so many places such patients can turn and they seem to fall between the cracks." 

Perceived memory problems are common and may be an early sign of future development of dementia. For those in the studied group who also had deviating biomarkers in their cerebrospinal fluid (beta-amyloid, total-tau and phospho-tau), the risk of deteriorating and developing dementia was more than double. However, the majority demonstrated no signs of deterioration after four years.

SEEKING MEDICAL ATTENTION

"These individuals have no objective signs of dementia. The issue instead is usually stress, anxiety or depression," says Marie Eckerström. 

One out of ten with only self-perceived memory problems developed dementia during the investigated period. According to Marie Eckerström, this is a higher percentage than the population in general, but is still low. 

"It is not a matter of just anyone who has occasional memory problems in everyday life. It is more a matter of individuals who sought medical attention to investigate whether they are developing serious problems," states Marie Eckerström. 

Sunday, September 17, 2017

Coconut Oil part of a Brain-Healthy Diet

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

There are hundreds of ways of incorporating coconut oil into a healthy diet to boost memory and cognition. Start with these 20 ideas.




As a cooking oil, replace polyunsaturated oils, "vegetable oils" such as corn and soy, with coconut oil. Coconut oil should be your main cooking oil, as it is heat stable, and will not become toxic in uses that require high heat.


Use coconut oil for frying: Gluten Free Fried Chicken Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2009/9/23/Gluten-Free-Fried-Chicken

Gluten Free Coconut Fried Fish Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2009/9/27/Gluten-Free-Coconut-Fri...

Use coconut oil for baking: Roast Chicken with Coconut Oil Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2010/3/19/roast-chicken-with-coco...

Use coconut oil for making your own mayonnaise: Coconut Mayonnaise Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2010/1/19/coconut-mayonnaise

Use coconut oil in dips: Coconut Ranch Party Dip Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2010/10/22/coconut-ranch-party-dip

Use coconut oil to make your own salad dressings: Spicy Coconut Cilantro Dressing Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2010/1/28/spicy-coconut-cilantro-...

Use coconut oil to make your own ketchup: Homemade Fresh Tomato Ketchup Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2011/6/1/homemade-fresh-tomato-ke...

Use coconut oil to make the best pie crusts: Coconut Oil Pie Crust Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2010/8/6/coconut-oil-pie-crust

Use coconut oil in your soups: Sweet Potato Coconut Peanut Butter Soup Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2009/11/15/sweet-potato-coconut-p...

Use coconut oil to make fudge: Black and White Toasted Coconut Fudge Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2011/12/9/black-white-toasted-coc...

Use coconut oil to make pudding: Quick Chocolate Coconut Pudding Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2010/3/2/quick-chocolate-coconut-...

Use coconut oil to make cookies: Gluten Free Chocolate Crinkles Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2010/12/7/gluten-free-chocolate-c...

Use coconut oil to make muffins: Gluten Free Lemon-Lime Coconut Flour Muffins Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2009/12/29/lemon-lime-coconut-flo...

Use coconut oil to make brownies: Coconut Peanut Butter Whole Wheat Brownies Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2010/2/24/coconut-peanut-butter-w...

Use coconut oil to make chocolate cake: Making A Foolproof Gluten Free Cake Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2009/11/10/making-a-foolproof-glu...

Use coconut oil to make chocolate candy: Homemade Honey Chocolate Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2011/2/18/homemade-honey-chocolate

Use coconut oil in gluten free and dairy free recipes: Strawberry Cream Pie - Gluten Free and Dairy Free Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2010/6/15/strawberry-cream-pie-gl...

Add coconut oil to your coffee: Spiced Coconut Mocha Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2011/11/23/spiced-coconut-mocha

Use coconut oil in hot chocolate: Coconut Peanut Butter Cup Hot Cocoa Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2010/1/5/coconut-peanut-butter-cu...

Use coconut oil to add energy to your smoothies: How to Add Coconut Oil to Smoothies without the Oil Clumping Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2011/8/24/how-to-add-coconut-oil-...

Use coconut oil in your protein shakes for extra energy: Chocolate Coconut Banana Protein Shake Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2010/5/7/chocolate-coconut-banana...

Use coconut oil in chocolate milk: Pecan Coconut Chocolate Milk Recipe - http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/index.cfm/2010/12/6/pecan-coconut-chocolate...

For hundreds of more uses of coconut oil, visit FreeCoconutRecipes.com where other coconut oil users submit their kitchen-tested coconut recipes. We post new recipes every week!
http://www.freecoconutrecipes.com/

Friday, September 15, 2017

Dementia and hurricanes

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

ADEAR


Natural disasters cause severe disruption and threaten many people. People with Alzheimer's disease can be especially vulnerable in disaster situations. Their impaired memory and reasoning may severely limit their ability to cope. For caregivers, it is important to have a disaster plan that incorporates the special needs of the person with Alzheimer's. 

Staying at Home


In some situations, you may decide to stay at home during a natural disaster. Plan ahead to meet your family's needs and those of the person with Alzheimer's for at least 3 days to a week. Include supplies and backup options in case you lose basic services. Refer to information from organizations such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency(FEMA) and the American Red Cross to make a general disaster plan. (See the “For More Information” section below.) 

You also will need special supplies for the person with Alzheimer's. Assemble a kit and store it in a watertight container. The kit might contain:

  • warm clothing
  • sturdy shoes
  • spare eyeglasses
  • hearing aid batteries
  • incontinence undergarments, wipes, and lotions
  • pillow, toy, or something the person can hold onto
  • medications
  • favorite snacks and high-nutrient drinks
  • zip-lock bags to hold medications and documents
  • copies of legal, medical, insurance, and Social Security information
  • physician's name, address, and phone number
  • recent photos of the person with Alzheimer's
Also as part of your disaster planning, have practice drills, with each member of the household performing specific tasks. Do not give the person with Alzheimer's responsibility in the plan. Assign somebody to take primary responsibility for him or her.

Because the needs of a person with Alzheimer's will change as the disease progresses, periodically update your plan to reflect these changes. For example, he or she is likely to become less mobile in the later stages of the disease. How will that affect your plan?


If You Must Leave Home

You may need to move to a safer place, like a community shelter or the home of a family member. Consider how you will get the person with Alzheimer's disease to go quickly and calmly. Be ready to use tactics that have worked in the past.

During relocation, the person with Alzheimer's might become very anxious and start to behave erratically. Remain as calm and supportive as possible. He or she is likely to respond to the tone you set. Be sensitive to his or her emotions. Stay close, offer your hand, or give the person a reassuring hug. Do not leave him or her alone.

To plan for an evacuation:

  • Know how to get to the nearest emergency shelters. Some areas have shelters for people with special needs. Local Red Cross chapters can direct you.
  • If you don't drive or driving is dangerous, arrange for a family member, friend, neighbor, or emergency service to transport you.
  • Make sure that the person with Alzheimer's is wearing an identification bracelet and/or that identifying tags are sewn into articles of clothing.
  • Take both general supplies and your Alzheimer's emergency kit.
  • Bring your cell phone charger and keep the phone charged. Save emergency numbers to your phone, including the Alzheimer's Association Safe Return phone number (1-800-625-3780), if you participate in that program.
  • Plan to keep neighbors, friends, and family informed about your location. Give them your phone numbers and a list of emergency numbers.
  • Be sure that other people have copies of the person's medical records. If necessary, they can provide these records to emergency medical staff to ensure that the person receives appropriate treatment and care.
  • Pack familiar, comforting items for the person.
  • If conditions are noisy or chaotic, prepare to find a quieter place.
  • Prepare to prevent wandering. Many people with Alzheimer's disease wander, especially under stress.
  • If possible, plan to take along the household pet to comfort the person.

If You Are Separated

You should not leave a person with Alzheimer's alone, but the unexpected can happen. Avoid asking a stranger to watch the person if possible. Also, do not count on the person with Alzheimer's to stay in one place.

To plan for possible separation:
  • Provide local police and emergency services with photos of the person and copies of his or her medical documents, so that they are aware of the person's needs. Be ready to alert them if you and the person in your care become separated.
  • Be sure that the person with Alzheimer's wears an identification bracelet.
  • Contact your local Alzheimer's Association chapter and enroll the person in the Medic Alert + Safe Return program —an identification and support service for people with Alzheimer's disease who may become lost or injured.
  • Make plans with trusted people who can help the person with Alzheimer's. Educate them about the person's disabilities. Give examples of simple instructions that the person may follow.
  • Give a trusted neighbor, friend, or relative a house key and a list of emergency phone numbers.

Take Care of Yourself

Staying healthy helps you provide the best possible care to the person with Alzheimer's disease. To protect your health during a natural disaster:
  • Ensure proper nutrition and hydration.
  • Rest.
  • Practice good hygiene.
  • Find a doctor and pharmacy.
  • Find a good listener or spiritual support.

FREE BOOKLET:

Hurricane Preparations - By the Alzheimer's Association 


Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Coconut oil and Alzheimer's

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

See a panel of doctors discuss why they recommend coconut oil for an Alzheimer's & dementia diet. 




To get started with adding coconut oil to your diet, check out:
20 Ways to Mix Coconut Oil into a Dementia Diet.

To understand why this diet works, read:
The Coconut-Oil-Dementia Diet
Dr. Anderson advocates coconut oil for his nursing home's dementia diet.

He explores 3 benefits:

  1. Coconut oil is rich in Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCT). The liver quickly converts MCTs to ketones, providing a quick "backup fuel" to the brain. This can be helpful in dementia, where the brain often suffers from a lack of energy from its regular "fuel", glucose.
  2. Coconut oil offers a low-carb solution to insulin resistance from diabetes. (Type-2 diabetes is common in seniors with dementia. In addition, Alzheimer's is sometimes called Type-3 diabetes.)
  3. Dr. Anderson sees this improving the problems of:
    • Agitation
    • Behavior
    • Polypharmacology (Too many pills).
Watch this panel of doctors share their experiences.

Fitness is important in dementia prevention. Click below for more info