Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Calm disturbing dementia behavior without drugs

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

University of Michigan Health System

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Doctors write millions of prescriptions a year for drugs to calm the behavior of people with Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia. But non-drug approaches actually work better, and carry far fewer risks, experts conclude in a new report. 

The DICE model aims to reduce psychotropic drug use in dementia
The new DICE model - for
Describe, Investigate, Evaluate, and Create -
seeks to reduce psychotropic medication use in dementia patients.

In fact, non-drug approaches should be the first choice for treating dementia patients’ common symptoms such as irritability, agitation, depression, anxiety, sleep problems, aggression, apathy and delusions, say the researchers in a paper just published by the British Medical Journal.

The best evidence among non-drug approaches is for those that focus on training caregivers — whether they are spouses, adult children or staff in nursing homes and assisted living facilities — to make behavioral and environmental interventions.

The researchers, from the University of Michigan Medical School and Johns Hopkins University, reviewed two decades’ worth of research to reach their conclusions about drugs like antipsychotics and antidepressants, and non-drug approaches that help caregivers address behavioral issues in dementia patients.

They lay out their findings along with a framework that doctors and caregivers can use to make the most of what’s already known. Called DICE for Describe, Investigate, Evaluate, and Create, the framework tailors approaches to each person with dementia, and as symptoms change.

“The evidence for non-pharmaceutical approaches to the behavior problems often seen in dementia is better than the evidence for antipsychotics, and far better than for other classes of medication,” says first author Helen C. Kales, M.D., head of the U-M Program for Positive Aging at the University of Michigan Health System and investigator at the VA Center for Clinical Management Research . “The issue and the challenge is that our health care system has not incentivized training in alternatives to drug use, and there is little to no reimbursement for caregiver-based methods.”

Coincidentally, a new U.S. Government Accountability Office report published the same day as the BMJ paper addresses the issue of overuse of antipsychotic medication for the behavior problems often seen in dementia.  It finds that one-third of older adults with dementia who had long-term nursing home stays in 2012 were prescribed an antipsychotic medication -- and that about 14 percent of those outside nursing homes were prescribed an antipsychotic that same year.

The GAO calls on the federal government to work to reduce use of these drugs further than it’s already doing, by addressing use in dementia patients outside nursing homes.

DICE model

Kales, however, cautions that penalizing doctors for prescribing antipsychotic drugs to these patients could backfire, if caregiver-based non-drug approaches aren’t encouraged.

She and her colleagues from Johns Hopkins, Laura N. Gitlin PhD and Constantine Lyketsos MD, note in their paper that “there needs to be a shift of resources from paying for psychoactive drugs and emergency room and hospital stays to adopting a more proactive approach.”

But they also write, “drugs still have their place, especially for the management of acute situations where the safety of the person with dementia or family caregiver may be at risk.” For instance, antidepressants make sense for dementia patients with severe depression, and antipsychotic drugs should be used when patients have psychosis or aggression that could lead them to harm themselves or others. But these uses should be closely monitored and ended as soon as possible,

The authors lay out five non-pharmacologic categories to start with based on their review of the medical evidence. These approaches have been shown to help reduce behavior issues:

  • Providing education for the caregiver
  • Enhancing effective communication between the caregiver and the person with dementia
  • Creating meaningful activities for the person with dementia
  • Simplifying tasks and establishing structured routines
  • Ensuring safety and simplifying and enhancing the environment around the patient, whether in the home or the nursing/assisted living setting
They also note that many “hidden” medical issues in dementia patients – such as urinary tract infection and other infections, constipation, dehydration and pain – can lead to behavioral issues, as can drug interactions. So physicians should look to assess and address these wherever possible.

Kales, Gitlin and Lyketsos  are working with the U-M Center for Health Communications Research to launch a National Institute of Nursing Research-sponsored clinical trial this spring that will test the DICE approach through a computer based tool for caregivers called the WeCareAdvisor. The tool will help families identify tips and resources in a single computer interface to address behavioral symptoms.  The tips are designed to prevent or mitigate possible triggers for common behavioral symptoms such as pacing, repetitive questioning, restlessness, or shadowing.

"Behavior-based strategies may take longer than prescriptions. But if you teach people the principles behind DICE, the approach becomes more natural and part of one’s routine. It can be very empowering for caregivers or nursing home staff.” -- Helen Kales, M.D.

For instance, de-cluttering the environment, using music or simple activities that help to engage a person with dementia , or using a calm voice instead of being confrontational, could help greatly to reduce behavioral symptoms, Kales says. And making sure that caregivers get breaks from their responsibilities and take care of themselves, especially in the home, can help them avoid burnout and taking their frustration out on patients.

“Behavior-based strategies may take longer than prescriptions,” acknowledges Kales, a member of the U-M Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation. “But if you teach people the principles behind DICE, the approach becomes more natural and part of one’s routine. It can be very empowering for caregivers or nursing home staff.”

More research on both new drug options and the best ways to assess and address behavioral symptoms is needed, the authors conclude. But in the meantime, the evidence to date comes down in favor of non-drug approaches in most cases.

Causes of dementia behavior issues

THE COMPONENTS OF THE DICE APPROACH ARE:

  • D: Describe - Asking the caregiver, and the person with dementia if possible, to describe the “who, what, when and where” of situations where problem behaviors occur and the physical and social context for them. Caregivers could take notes about the situations that led to behavior issues, to share with health professionals during visits.
  • I: Investigate – Having the health provider look into all the aspects of the person’s health, dementia symptoms, current medications and sleep habits, that might be combining with physical, social and caregiver-related factors to produce the behavior.
  • C: Create – Working together, the patient’s caregiver and health providers develop a plan to prevent and respond to behavioral issues in the person with dementia, including everything from enhancing the patient’s activities and environment, to educating and supporting the caregiver.

  • E: Evaluate – Giving the provider responsibility for assessing how well the plan is being followed and how it’s working, or what might need to be changed.

More information

Reference: BMJ 2015; 350 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.h369 (Published 02 March 2015)

Funding: National Institutes of Health, NR014200, Johns Hopkins Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (P50AG005146).

Previous publication - the DICE model: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, April 2014. Paper

Sunday, October 15, 2017

Drug to prevent Alzheimer's

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Neuroscience News

Source: University of Kentucky.
Researchers have known for decades that the hallmark plaques and tangles in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s develop long before people experience memory loss. Ai-Ling Lin, an assistant professor at Sanders-Brown, hopes to demonstrate that low doses of Rapamycin, a drug commonly used as an immunosuppressant for organ transplant recipients, can restore brain function before the disease changes in the brain affect a person’s memory.
“We know that Rapamycin signals blood vessels to dilate, which increases cerebral blood flow and helps regulate the physical and chemical processes that support effective cell function – also known as metabolic homeostasis,” Lin said. “We hope our research will demonstrate that Rapamycin prompts tangible benefit by preventing the cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer’s disease.”
Her study is unique in that it will also assess whether a relatively new imaging concept called multimodal MRI (mMRI) is effective in measuring the efficacy of other potential treatments. mMRI uses traditional MRI plus another form of imaging (CT scan or PET scan, for example) to provide complementary information.
“We have two eyes for a reason. You can function with just one, but eyesight is improved when both eyes work well,” Lin explained. “mMRI follows the same concept: multiple layers of data increase accuracy.”
“If I can demonstrate that mMRI is an effective surrogate for the types of testing we currently have at our disposal, we have a new avenue to explore potential treatments on a faster and more straightforward track.”
Lin will be studying the drug in mice with the APOE4 gene, which is associated with an increased risk of AD. She will validate mMRI results with biological and behavioral tests to confirm mMRI’s accuracy.
alzheimers brain
Lin will be studying the drug in mice with the APOE4 gene, which is associated with an increased risk of AD. She will validate mMRI results with biological and behavioral tests to confirm mMRI’s accuracy. NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.
Her work will be funded by a five-year, $2.88 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.
It will be a while before Rapamycin as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer’s will be ready for human clinical trials, but the concept of mMRI as a surrogate for other testing methods has potential for speedy adoption, as the mMRI methods are readily available to be used in humans. “Being able to test a drug and also a means of assessing other drugs in the future is truly exciting,” Lin said.
Linda Van Eldik, director of the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, says that this latest grant is another important step in Sanders-Brown’s race against Alzheimer’s.

“As many as one in five people carry the Alzheimer’s gene APOE4, so the idea that a readily-available drug already demonstrated to be safe in humans might prevent what is arguably the most devastating and expensive disease in modern history is exciting,” said Van Eldik. “On top of that, Ai-Ling’s work might also speed the ability to test other treatments. It’s a win-win for science and for the people it serves.”
ABOUT THIS NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH ARTICLE

Source: Laura Dawahare – University of Kentucky
Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.
Video Source: Video credited to University of Kentucky.

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Is high blood sugar a dementia risk

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Group Health Research Institute.

17 out of 17 levels of people's sugar showed a direct connection between sugar & dementia. See the results and read researcher's conclusions. 



A joint Group Health-University of Washington (UW) study in the New England Journal of Medicine has found that higher blood sugar levels are associated with higher dementia risk, even among people who do not have diabetes. (Continued below video.)

Continued below video...


Blood sugar levels averaged over a five-year period were associated with rising risks for developing dementia, in this report about more than 2,000 Group Health patients age 65 and older in the Adult Changes in Thought (ACT) study.

For example, in people without diabetes, risk for dementia was 18 percent higher for people with an average glucose level of 115 milligrams per deciliter compared to those with an average glucose level of 100 mg/dl. And in people with diabetes, whose blood sugar levels are generally higher, dementia risk was 40 percent higher for people with an average glucose level of 190 mg/dl compared to those with an average glucose level of 160 mg/dl.

"The most interesting finding was that every incrementally higher glucose level was associated with a higher risk of dementia in people who did not have diabetes," said first author Paul K. Crane, MD, MPH, an associate professor of medicine at the UW School of Medicine, adjunct associate professor of health services at the UW School of Public Health, and affiliate investigator at Group Health Research Institute. "There was no threshold value for lower glucose values where risk leveled off."

"One major strength of this research is that it is based on the ACT study, a longitudinal cohort study, where we follow people for many years as they lead their lives," said senior author Eric B. Larson, MD, MPH, a senior investigator at Group Health Research Institute who also has appointments at the UW Schools of Medicine and Public Health. "We combine information from people's research visits every other year with data from their visits to Group Health providers whenever they receive care. And this gave us an average of 17 blood sugar measurements per person: very rich data."

These measurements included blood glucose (some fasting, some not) and glycated hemoglobin (also known as HbA1c). Blood sugar levels rise and fall in peaks and valleys throughout each day, but glycated hemoglobin doesn't vary as much over short intervals.

Combining glucose and glycated hemoglobin measures into a composite measure required special statistical techniques, which Drs. Crane and Larson's co-authors Rod Walker, MS, a biostatistician, and Rebecca Hubbard, PhD, an associate investigator, both from Group Health Research Institute, had developed. (Dr. Hubbard is also an affiliate assistant professor of biostatistics at the UW School of Public Health.) These sophisticated statistical models required specialized data on the relationships between glycated hemoglobin and glucose levels, and they used data generated by co-author David M. Nathan, MD, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Diabetes Center at Massachusetts General Hospital.


Journal Reference
:So should people try to eat less sugar -- or foods with a lower "glycemic index"? Not necessarily, Dr. Crane said: "Your body turns your food into glucose, so your blood sugar levels depend not only on what you eat but also on your individual metabolism: how your body handles your food." But he does suggest that taking walks couldn't hurt: The ACT study has previously linked physical activity to later onset and reduced risk of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease.


Furthermore, Dr. Crane emphasized that these results come from an observational study: "What we found was that people with higher levels of glucose had a higher risk of dementia, on average, than did people with lower levels of glucose," he said. "While that is interesting and important, we have no data to suggest that people who make changes to lower their glucose improve their dementia risk. Those data would have to come from future studies with different study designs."


  1. Paul K. Crane, Rod Walker, Rebecca A. Hubbard, Ge Li, David M. Nathan, Hui Zheng, Sebastien Haneuse, Suzanne Craft, Thomas J. Montine, Steven E. Kahn, Wayne McCormick, Susan M. McCurry, James D. Bowen, Eric B. Larson. Glucose Levels and Risk of DementiaNew England Journal of Medicine, 2013; 369 (6): 540 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1215740

Monday, October 9, 2017

Can you tell if your memory is failing

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

University of Kentucky

Can you diagnose yourself? An important study suggests that self-reported memory complaints might predict clinical memory impairment later in life. 




Erin Abner, an assistant professor at University of Kentucky Sanders- Brown Center on Aging, asked 3,701 men aged 60 and higher a simple question: "Have you noticed any change in your memory since you last came in?"

That question led to some interesting results. "It seems that subjective memory complaint can be predictive of clinical memory impairment," Abner said. "Other epidemiologists have seen similar results, which is encouraging, since it means we might really be on to something."

The results are meaningful because it might help identify people who are at risk of developing Alzheimer's Disease sooner. "If the memory and thinking lapses people notice themselves could be early markers of risk for Alzheimer's disease, we might eventually be able to intervene earlier in the aging process to postpone and/or reduce the effects of cognitive memory impairment."

Abner, who is also a member of the faculty in the UK Department of Epidemiology, took pains to emphasize that her work shouldn't necessarily worry everyone who's ever forgotten where they left their keys.

"I don't want to alarm people," she said. "It's important to distinguish between normal memory lapses and significant memory problems, which usually change over time and affect multiple aspects of daily life."



Related Videos & Articles:

  1. SAGE Pen & Paper Alzheimer's Test
  2. How Do You Know If Someone Has Alzheimer's?



MORE INFORMATION:

The Sanders-Brown Center on Aging at the University of Kentucky is nationally recognized for its research, education and outreach, and clinical programs on healthy brain aging and neurodegenerative disorders. In 1985, the SBCoA was named as an Alzheimer’s Disease Center, one of the original ten centers funded by the National Institute on Aging.

Saturday, October 7, 2017

B vitamins help the brain stay fit

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

SOURCE:
  • The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 22,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to promoting the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as epilepsy, dystonia, migraine, Huntington’s disease, and dementia. For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit http://www.aan.com.


B vitamins protect the brain and lower Alzheimer's risk. How do they work? See which ones are best for various diets.




ST. PAUL, Minn. – A key study shows that vitamin B12 may protect against Alzheimer’s, adding more evidence to the scientific debate about whether the vitamin is effective in reducing risk of memory loss. The research is published in Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Reduce Alzheimer's Agitation with Dextromethorphan-Quinidine Pill

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

JAMA

Aggression and agitation are hard challenges in dementia. An important study may offer some simple answers.


In a preliminary 10-week randomized trial, patients with probable Alzheimer disease who received the combination medication dextromethorphan-quinidine demonstrated less occurrences and severity of agitation, compared to patients who received placebo, according to a study in JAMA (The Journal of the American Medical Association)1

Dr. Jeffrey Cummings, director of the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health, said, "Agitation in Alzheimer's disease is one of the most disabling aspects of the disease. It interferes with the patient's life. It interferes with the ability of the caregiver to take care of the patient. It degrades the quality of life of both the patient and the caregiver."

Agitation & Aggression

Agitation and aggression are highly prevalent in patients with dementia and are associated with distress for patients and caregivers, greater risk of institutionalization, and accelerated progression to severe dementia and death. Nonpharmacological interventions are recommended as first-line therapy, but many patients fail to respond. Although many classes of psychotropic drugs are prescribed for agitation, safety concerns and modest or unproven efficacy limit their use, according to background information in the article.

Drug Combo

Dextromethorphan is commonly used in cough medicine. Quinidine is normally used to regulate an abnormal heart beat. Cummings said the combination pill had a substantial effect, greatly reducing agitation compared to the patients who got the placebo. Furthermore, he said, the caregivers also benefited. "There was a reduction in the stress experienced for caregivers of the patients who were treated with the dextromethorphan-quinidine combination. 

The combination of the drugs is also approved for the treatment of pseudobulbar affect (a neurologic disorder characterized by episodes of emotional displays such as crying), and there is evidence suggesting the potential benefit of these drugs for agitation. The researchers randomly assigned 220 patients to receive dextromethorphan-quinidine or placebo in stage 1. In stage 2, patients receiving dextromethorphan-quinidine continued; those receiving placebo were stratified by response and re-randomized to dextromethorphan-quinidine or placebo. The 10 week trial was conducted at 42 study sites.

Trial Results

A total of 194 patients (88 percent) completed the study. Analysis combining stages 1 (all patients) and 2 (re-randomized placebo nonresponders) showed significantly reduced measures of agitation (occurrence and severity of symptoms). Patients treated with only dextromethorphan-quinidine had an average 51 percent reduction in the measure of agitation from baseline to week 10, compared with 26 percent for those treated with only placebo.

Adverse events included falls (8.6 percent for dextromethorphan-quinidine vs 3.9 percent for placebo), diarrhea (5.9 percent vs 3.1 percent, respectively), and urinary tract infection (5.3 percent vs 3.9 percent, respectively). Serious adverse events occurred in 7.9 percent with dextromethorphan-quinidine vs 4.7 percent with placebo. Dextromethorphan-quinidine was not associated with cognitive impairment or sedation.

Conclusions

"These preliminary findings require confirmation in additional clinical trials with longer treatment duration," the authors write.

Pending further evidence, there is a reasonably strong case to prioritize dextromethorphan-quinidine as an off-label treatment for agitation, possibly as a safer alternative to atypical antipsychotics, writes Anne Corbett, Ph.D., of King's College London, and colleagues in an accompanying editorial.

"However, while further studies are conducted to verify the efficacy and safety of this approach, it will be important to achieve a robust international expert consensus regarding the prioritization of potential treatments for agitation in patients with dementia to improve the consistency of clinical practice. This approach also must understand and incorporate patient and caregiver views regarding the evaluation of risk and benefits in relation to these treatments."


References:
  1. Clive Ballard, Samantha Sharp, Anne Corbett. Dextromethorphan and Quinidine for Treating Agitation in Patients With Alzheimer Disease DementiaJAMA, 2015; 314 (12): 1233 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.10215
  2. Jeffrey L. Cummings, Constantine G. Lyketsos, Elaine R. Peskind, Anton P. Porsteinsson, Jacobo E. Mintzer, Douglas W. Scharre, Jose E. De La Gandara, Marc Agronin, Charles S. Davis, Uyen Nguyen, Paul Shin, Pierre N. Tariot, João Siffert. Effect of Dextromethorphan-Quinidine on Agitation in Patients With Alzheimer Disease DementiaJAMA, 2015; 314 (12): 1242 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.10214

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Pharmacists can help with dementia

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Aston University
  • Study reveals patients often struggle to manage their drug regime
  • Community pharmacists could be used more to support patients and carers
  • Some carers find the responsibility of their role stressful


New research funded by Pharmacy Research UK, reveals people with dementia may struggle with managing their medication – exposing them to side-effects, medication errors and an increased risk of non-adherence to drug treatment. 

Researchers at Aston University, Hull University and the UEA interviewed family carers, people with dementia, nurses, GPs and community pharmacists for the project. 

Their year-long research found that as dementia develops the person struggles to manage their own medication and increasingly relies on support from family carers. This is often their partner, who may also be taking many medicines and finding the carer role stressful, thus increasing the risk of medication error. 

The study showed that for some carers this was a real burden of responsibility and that they hid their anxieties. 

Lead researcher Dr. Ian Maidment, Senior Lecturer in Clinical Pharmacy at Aston said: “Our study found incorrect dosing, forgetting to give the medication and taking medicines which should have been stopped.” 

Professor Chris Fox, Consultant Old Age Psychiatrist from UEA’s Norwich Medical School said: “There can be severe health impact for both the patient and carer - too often in my clinical practice I come across patients and families overburdened and unclear about their medication regimes. This can result in more visits to their GP and hospital and is a cause of avoidable NHS admissions.” 

Dr. Andrea Hilton from Hull University added: “There is a substantial role for community pharmacists and their teams to assist carers; many pharmacists have day-to-day contact both with carers and people with dementia. Community pharmacy is in a unique position to support and embrace patient-centred care and this is currently under-utilised. This research highlights that community pharmacists should be working more with GP practices and have full access to patients’ medical records. Furthermore, home visits should be conducted for medication reviews.” Barbara Woodward-Carlton a former carer and a member of the Alzheimer’s Society Research Network highlighted: “During the years I looked after my mother who had Alzheimer's disease I wish I had known what help I could have had from community pharmacists. 

“My mother was an extremely pleasant person who always wanted to co-operate but found it incomprehensible that she should be taking any medication at all. At one point when she was very ill, I continued the medication she had been given including 'water tablets' without realising that she was dehydrated..." 


"I live with the shame of not knowing that as she was barely drinking and eating I should have stopped that medication. I welcome that community pharmacists are increasingly seen as those who can advise, educate and help those of us who care for others." 

Dr. Clare Walton, Research Manager at Alzheimer’s Society said: “Seven in 10 people with dementia are also living with other health conditions and managing multiple medications which can be a tremendous challenge. Finding new and innovative ways to support people with dementia and their carers to safely and correctly age their medication is a focus for future research.” 

Dr. Maidment added: “People with dementia are amongst the most vulnerable members of society and need more support with medication management. We need to develop new ways of supporting people with dementia manage their management and then test how well these new ways work.” 


Reference Article: A qualitative study exploring medication management in people with dementia living in the community and the potential role of the community pharmacist, Ian D. Maidment PhD, Lydia Aston MA, Tiago Moutela MA, Chris G. Fox MBBS Bsc Mmmedsci MRCPsych MD, Andrea Hilton PhD, Health Expectations>, doi: 10.1111/hex.12534, published 19 January 2017.

About the study 
  • A qualitative study exploring medication management in people with dementia living in the community and the potential role of the community pharmacist is published in the journal Health Expectations.
  • The research was funded by Pharmacy Research UK (PRUK), the principal funder of pharmacy research in the UK. Founded as a result of a merger in 2012 of two previous research funding charities, PRUK has a broad programme of research in place. PRUK funds both research projects and individual bursaries to improve skills across the pharmacy sector. More information is on their website www.pharmacyresearchuk.org
  • The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Dementias Writing Group support was critical to develop this research. The NIHR Dementias Writing Groups are a central component of the framework for co-ordinating and supporting dementia research in the UK. The groups provide a route through which new ideas for clinical studies are developed.
  • Anyone interested in registering their interest in participating in other dementia research studies can sign up to Join Dementia Research online at www.joindementiaresearch.nihr.ac.uk
About Aston University 
  • Founded in 1895 and a University since 1966, Aston University has been always been a force for change. For 50 years the University has been transforming lives through pioneering research, innovative teaching and graduate employability success. Aston is renowned for its opportunity enabler through broad access and inspiring academics, providing education that is applied and has real impact on all areas of society, business and industry. True to Aston’s Coat of Arms which bears the word ‘Forward’, in 2016 Aston held a year-long anniversary celebration to recognise its heritage and achievements, but with a focus to drive forward the next stage in the University’s exciting journey. www.aston.ac.uk/50
  • Aston's Vice Chancellor and Chief Executive, Professor Alec Cameron, is the principal academic and executive officer of the University. Alec has overall responsibility for Aston's executive management and day-to-day direction.


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