Monday, July 15, 2019

Best Alzheimer's Drugs

Image result for pills pictures

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

St. Michael's Hospital: 
See safety and effectiveness rankings for four Alzheimer's drugs. Ranked on concentration, memory, alertness and mood, learn what the researchers found. 




An important study, ranking the safety and effectiveness of four drugs taken to enhance concentration, memory, alertness and moods, found that donepezil was most likely to effectively improve cognition in patients with Alzheimer's dementia. 

However, patients who took donepezil were more likely to experience side effects including nausea, vomiting and diarrhea than those who received a placebo, according to the study, published online in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Improving Cognition in Alzheimer's

Drugs for Early to Midstage
Brand NameGeneric Name
Aricept®donepezil
Exelon®rivastigmine
Remynil or Razadyne®galantamine
Drugs for Moderate to Severe Stage
Namenda® or Ebixa®memantine
In 2015, 46 million people worldwide had Alzheimer's disease, according to the study. In 2013, 146,593 people aged 65 and older in Ontario alone used cognitive enhancers, according to a 2016 Ontario Drug Policy Research report. 

"Alzheimer's dementia is the most common form of dementia in North America, and most people who have moderate to severe Alzheimer's will be on these medications," said Dr. Andrea Tricco, a scientist in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital and lead author of the study. "This analysis will give both patients and clinicians a full picture of how each of these drugs will likely affect their cognition, as well as their overall health."

Safety & Effectiveness

Although there have been previous reviews of the safety and effectiveness of cognitive enhancers in treating Alzheimer's dementia, the authors said this was the first to rank their comparative safety and effectiveness. 

The study used network meta-analysis, an advanced statistical analysis technique, to systematically review existing evidence from 142 clinical trials of four common cognitive enhancers administered alone or in combination published between 1996 and 2015. The number of patients in each study ranged from 13 to 2,045, and the review evaluated a total of 33,889 patients. 




The researchers compared the safety and effectiveness of any combination of donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine or memantine in treating moderate to severe Alzheimer's dementia based on the results of the clinical trials that examined a number of patient outcomes, including cognition, function behaviour, global status, mortality, serious adverse events, falls, bradycardia, headache, diarrhea, vomiting and nausea. Donepezil was likely the most effective medication for Alzheimer's dementia across all effectiveness outcomes, including cognition, behavior and overall health, according to the study.

Best Course of Alzheimer's Treatment

Donepezil was also the only cognitive enhancer that reached the minimal clinically important threshold -- meaning effects on outcomes were observed clinically, as well as statistically -- on the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment cognition scale, making it the likely first choice for those patients and clinicians considering these medications, the authors said.

Although no significant risk of serious harm, falls or reduced heart rate was associated with any of the medications in the study, the data was limited on these specific outcomes.

Previous research by the authors found that cognitive enhancers do not improve cognition or function in people with mild cognitive impairment, and these patients experience significantly more nausea, diarrhea, vomiting and headaches.

The findings of the current study will help guide patients and clinicians who are making decisions about the best course of treatment for Alzheimer's dementia, said Dr. Tricco.

"The more information we are able to gather about how each of these medications can affect a patient's cognition and health, the more likely we are to be able to improve their health outcomes," she said.

REFERENCE:
SOURCE:
  • St. Michael's Hospital:
    St. Michael’s Hospital provides compassionate care to all who enter its doors. The hospital also provides outstanding medical education to future health care professionals in more than 29 academic disciplines. Critical care and trauma, heart disease, neurosurgery, diabetes, cancer care, care of the homeless and global health are among the Hospital’s recognized areas of expertise. Through the Keenan Research Centre and the Li Ka Shing International Healthcare Education Centre, which make up the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, research and education at St. Michael’s Hospital are recognized and make an impact around the world. Founded in 1892, the hospital is fully affiliated with the U
    niversity of Toronto.

Friday, July 12, 2019

How nuts help the brain

Image result for peanuts pictures

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

University of South Australia

In 4,000 elders, nuts boosted cognition by 60% and delayed memory decline by 2 years. See the "Healthy Nuts" chart, detailing the benefits of 10 different nuts. Watch these videos to learn why long-term, high nut consumption is a key to better thinking in older adults. 




Long-term, high nut consumption could be the key to better cognitive health in older people according to new research from the University of South Australia. 


In a study of 4822 Chinese adults aged 55+ years, researchers found that eating more than 10 grams of nuts a day was positively associated with better mental functioning, including improved thinking, reasoning and memory.

Cognition & Nut Intake

Lead researcher, UniSA's Dr Ming Li, says the study is the first to report an association between cognition and nut intake in older Chinese adults, providing important insights into increasing mental health issues (including dementia) faced by an ageing population. 

"Population aging is one of the most substantial challenges of the twenty-first century. Not only are people living longer, but as they age, they require additional health support which is placing unprecedented pressure on aged-care and health services," Dr Li says.

Nuts are a Preventative Dietary Modification

"In China, this is a massive issue, as the population is ageing far more rapidly than almost any other country in the world. 

"Improved and preventative health care -- including dietary modifications -- can help address the challenges that an aging population presents.

Two Teaspoons Vs. No Teaspoons of Nuts

"By eating more than 10 grams (or two teaspoons) of nuts per day older people could improve their cognitive function by up to 60 per cent- compared to those not eating nuts -- effectively warding off what would normally be experienced as a natural two-year cognition decline." 

China has one of the fastest growing aging populations. In 2029, China's population is projected to peak at 1.44 billion, with the ratio of young to old dramatically imbalanced by the rising ranks of the elderly. By 2050, 330 million Chinese will be over age 65, and 90.4 million will be over age 80, representing the world's largest population of this most elderly age group.

17% Consume Nuts Regularly

More broadly, the World Health Organization says that by 2020, the number of people aged 60 years and older will outnumber children younger than five years old. 

The UniSA study analysed nine waves of China Health Nutrition Survey data collected over 22 years, finding that 17 per cent of participants were regular consumers of nuts (mostly peanuts). Dr Li says peanuts have specific anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects which can alleviate and reduce cognitive decline.

No Cure, But Nuts Offer Improvements

"Nuts are known to be high in healthy fats, protein and fibre with nutritional properties that can lower cholesterol and improve cognitive health," Dr Li says. 

"While there is no cure for age-related cognition decline and neurogenerative disease, variations in what people eat are delivering improvements for older people." 

The World Health Organization estimates that globally, the number of people living with dementia is at 47 million.

Modifying Diet Worth the Effort

By 2030, this is projected to rise to 75 million and by 2050, global dementia cases are estimated to almost triple. China has the largest population of people with dementia.x 

"As people age, they naturally experience changes to conceptual reasoning, memory, and processing speed. This is all part of the normal ageing process," Dr. Li says. 

"But age is also the strongest known risk factor for cognitive disease. If we can find ways to help older people retain their cognitive health and independence for longer -- even by modifying their diet -- then this absolutely worth the effort." 





Saturday, July 6, 2019

How do lettuce and oil protect the brain

250+ ORGANICALLY Grown Arugula Roquette Rocket Seeds Heirloom Non-GMO Delicious and Healthy, Eruca Sativa, from USA

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


King's College London


A diet that combines unsaturated fats with nitrite-rich vegetables, such as olive oil and lettuce, can protect you from hypertension and vascular dementia. Learn which foods are helpful and why.




A diet that combines unsaturated fats with nitrite-rich vegetables, such as olive oil and lettuce, can protect you from hypertension, suggests a dietary study led by King's College London. Hypertension is a major risk factor for vascular dementia.

The findings, published in the journal PNAS, help to explain why some previous studies have shown that a Mediterranean diet can reduce blood pressure.

The Mediterranean diet typically includes unsaturated fats found in:

  • olive oil,
  • nuts
  • avocados,
along with vegetables that are rich in nitrites and nitrates like: 
  • spinach,
  • celery
  • carrots.
When these two food groups are combined, the reaction of unsaturated fatty acids with nitrogen compounds in the vegetables results in the formation of nitro fatty acids.

The study, supported by the British Heart Foundation, used mice to investigate the process by which these nitro fatty acids lower blood pressure, looking at whether they inhibited an enzyme known as soluble Epoxide Hydrolase which regulates blood pressure.

Mice genetically engineered to be resistant to this inhibitory process were found to maintain their high blood pressure despite being fed the type of nitro fatty acids that normally form when a Mediterranean diet is consumed. However, nitro fatty acids were found to lower the blood pressure of normal mice following the same diets.

Thus, the study concludes that the protective effect of the Mediterranean diet, combining unsaturated fats and vegetables abundant in nitrite and nitrate, comes at least in part from the nitro fatty acids generated which inhibit soluble Epoxide Hydrolase to lower blood pressure.

Professor Philip Eaton, Professor of Cardiovascular Biochemistry at King's College London, said: 

"The findings of our study help to explain why previous research has shown that a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil or nuts can reduce the incidence of cardiovascular problems like stroke, heart failure and heart attacks."


Source:

Journal Reference:
  1. Rebecca L. Charles, Olena Rudyk, Oleksandra Prysyazhna, Alisa Kamynina, Jun Yang, Christophe Morisseau, Bruce D. Hammock, Bruce A. Freeman, and Philip Eaton. Protection from hypertension in mice by the Mediterranean diet is mediated by nitro fatty acid inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolasePNAS, May 2014 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1402965111

Saturday, June 29, 2019

How pharmacists can help with dementia medication

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or tw



Image result for pill picture

HELP FROM THE PHARMACY:

  • Study reveals patients 
  • need help managing drugs
  • Community pharmacists could be used more to support patients and carers
  • Assisting carers reduces error and anxiety


New research funded by Pharmacy Research UK, reveals people with dementia may struggle with managing their medication – exposing them to side-effects, medication errors and an increased risk of non-adherence to drug treatment. 

Researchers at Aston University, Hull University and the UEA interviewed family carers, people with dementia, nurses, GPs and community pharmacists for the projeHelp with Medication Struggles

Their year-long research found that as dementia develops the person struggles to manage their own medication and increasingly relies on support from family carers. This is often their partner, who may also be taking many medicines and finding the carer role stressful, thus increasing the risk of medication error. 

The study showed that for some carers this was a real burden of responsibility and that they hid their anxieties. 

Lead researcher Dr. Ian Maidment, Senior Lecturer in Clinical Pharmacy at Aston said: “Our study found incorrect dosing, forgetting to give the medication and taking medicines which should have been stopped.”Professor Chris Fox, Consultant Old Age Psychiatrist from UEA’s Norwich Medical School said: “There can be severe health impact for both the patient and carer - too often in my clinical practice I come across patients and families overburdened and unclear about their medication regimes. This can result in more visits to their GP and hospital and is a cause of avoidable NHS admissions.”Professor Chris Fox, Consultant Old Age Psychiatrist from UEA’s Norwich Medical School said: “There can be severe health impact for both the patient and carer - too often in my clinical practice I come across patients and families overburdened and unclear about their medication regimes. This can result in more visits to their GP and hospital and is a cause of avoidable NHS admissions.”

Patient-Centered Care in Dementia

Dr. Andrea Hilton from Hull University added: “There is a substantial role for community pharmacists and their teams to assist carers; many pharmacists have day-to-day contact both with carers and people with dementia. Community pharmacy is in a unique position to support and embrace patient-centred care and this is currently under-utilised. This research highlights that community pharmacists should be working more with GP practices and have full access to patients’ medical records. Furthermore, home visits should be conducted for medication reviews.” Barbara Woodward-Carlton a former carer and a member of the Alzheimer’s Society Research Network highlighted: “During the years I looked after my mother who had Alzheimer's disease I wish I had known what help I could have had from community pharmacists. 

“My mother was an extremely pleasant person who always wanted to co-operate but found it incomprehensible that she should be taking any medication at all. At one point when she was very ill, I continued the medication she had been given including 'water tablets' without realising that she was dehydrated..." 

patient-Centered Care in Dementia

Dr. Andrea Hilton from Hull University added: “There is a substantial role for community pharmacists and their teams to assist carers; many pharmacists have day-to-day contact both with carers and people with dementia. Community pharmacy is in a unique position to support and embrace patient-centred care and this is currently under-utilised. This research highlights that community pharmacists should be working more with GP practices and have full access to patients’ medical records. Furthermore, home visits should be conducted for medication reviews.” Barbara Woodward-Carlton a former carer and a member of the Alzheimer’s Society Research Network highlighted: “During the years I looked after my mother who had Alzheimer's disease I wish I had known what help I could have had from community pharmacists. 

“My mother was an extremely pleasant person who always wanted to co-operate but found it incomprehensible that she should be taking any medication at all. At one point when she was very ill, I continued the medication she had been given including 'water tablets' without realising that she was dehydrated..." 

"I live with the shame of not knowing that as she was barely drinking and eating I should have stopped that medication. I welcome that community pharmacists are increasingly seen as those who can advise, educate and help those of us who care for others." 

Dr. Clare Walton, Research Manager at Alzheimer’s Society said: “Seven in 10 people with dementia are also living with other health conditions and managing multiple medications which can be a tremendous challenge. Finding new and innovative ways to support people with dementia and their carers to safely and correctly age their medication is a focus for future research.” 

Dr. Maidment added: “People with dementia are amongst the most vulnerable members of society and need more support with medication management. We need to develop new ways of supporting people with dementia manage their management and then test how well these new ways work.” 


Reference Article: A qualitative study exploring medication management in people with dementia living in the community and the potential role of the community pharmacist, Ian D. Maidment PhD, Lydia Aston MA, Tiago Moutela MA, Chris G. Fox MBBS Bsc Mmmedsci MRCPsych MD, Andrea Hilton PhD, Health Expectations>, doi: 10.1111/hex.12534, published 19 January 2017.

About the study 

  • A qualitative study exploring medication management in people with dementia living in the community and the potential role of the community pharmacist is published in the journal Health Expectations.
  • The research was funded by Pharmacy Research UK (PRUK), the principal funder of pharmacy research in the UK. Founded as a result of a merger in 2012 of two previous research funding charities, PRUK has a broad programme of research in place. PRUK funds both research projects and individual bursaries to improve skills across the pharmacy sector. More information is on their website www.pharmacyresearchuk.org
  • The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Dementias Writing Group support was critical to develop this research. The NIHR Dementias Writing Groups are a central component of the framework for co-ordinating and supporting dementia research in the UK. The groups provide a route through which new ideas for clinical studies are developed.
  • Anyone interested in registering their interest in participating in other dementia research studies can sign up to Join Dementia Research online at www.joindementiaresearch.nihr.ac.uk
About Aston University 
  • Founded in 1895 and a University since 1966, Aston University has been always been a force for change. For 50 years the University has been transforming lives through pioneering research, innovative teaching and graduate employability success. Aston is renowned for its opportunity enabler through broad access and inspiring academics, providing education that is applied and has real impact on all areas of society, business and industry. True to Aston’s Coat of Arms which bears the word ‘Forward’, in 2016 Aston held a year-long anniversary celebration to recognise its heritage and achievements, but with a focus to drive forward the next stage in the University’s exciting journey. www.aston.ac.uk/50
  • Aston's Vice Chancellor and Chief Executive, Professor Alec Cameron, is the principal academic and executive officer of the University. Alec has overall responsibility for Aston's executive management and day-to-day direction.
SOURCE:

 


Thursday, June 27, 2019

How to bath those with dementia without a struggle

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get 

an easyceu or two

Pines Education Institute
Senior man in bath washing himself smiling : Stock Photo



Teepa Snow, a nationally acclaimed Alzheimer's and dementia care specialist, teaches her students how a person with dementia perceives his/her world and how to properly adapt one's own behavior to increase communication and mutual understanding. 

Learn Teepa Snow's effective hands-on techniques to ease your daily caregiving tasks and increase the quality of life for your loved one or patient. In this training DVD, Teepa demonstrates effective approaches to bathing, eating, dressing, transfers, and how to respond to certain types of behaviors in patients with dementia. 

"The Art of Caregiving" is presented by The Pines Education Institute of SW Florida and facilitated by Teepa Snow, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA. 

SOURCE:
  • Pines Education Institute of S.W. Florida and Teepa Snow


Monday, June 24, 2019

How B vitamins decrease brain loss

Caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Nature Made Vitamin B-12 Timed Release Tablets 1000 mcg

The American Academy of Neurology
The American Academy of Neurology

ST. PAUL, Minn. – A key study shows that vitamin B12 may protect against Alzheimer’s, adding more evidence to the scientific debate about whether the vitamin is effective in reducing risk of memory loss. The research is published in Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology


“Our findings show the need for further research on the role of vitamin B12 as a marker for identifying people who are at increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease,” said study author Babak Hooshmand, MD, MSc, with Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden. “Low levels of vitamin B12 are surprisingly common in the elderly. However, the few studies that have investigated the usefulness of vitamin B12 supplements to reduce the risk of memory loss have had mixed results.”

For the seven-year study, researchers took blood samples from 271 Finnish people age 65 to 79 who did not have dementia at the start of the study. During that time, 17 people developed Alzheimer’s disease. Blood samples were tested for levels for homocysteine, an amino acid associated with vitamin B12, and for levels of the active portion of the vitamin, called holotranscobalamin. Too much homocysteine in the blood has been linked to negative effects on the brain, such as stroke. However, higher levels of vitamin B12 can lower homocysteine.

The study found that for each micromolar increase in the concentration of homocysteine, the risk of Alzheimer’s disease increased by 16 percent, whereas each picomolar increase in concentration of the active form of vitamin B12 reduced risk by two percent. The results stayed the same after taking into account other factors, such as age, gender, education, smoking status, blood pressure and body mass index. The addition of folate did not appear to raise or lower the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.
“More research is needed to confirm these findings before vitamin B12 should be used solely as a supplement to help protect memory,” said Hooshmand.

Vitamin B12 can be found in fish, poultry and other meat products.

MORE INFORMATION:
  • The study was supported by the Karolinska Institutet, the Swedish Research Council for Medical Research, the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme, the Academy of Finland, the Ragnhild and Einar Lundströms Minne LindhĂ©s Foundation, the Stohnes Foundation, the Gamla Tjanarinnor Foundation and the Dementia Foundation of Sweden.
SOURCE:
  • The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 22,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to promoting the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as epilepsy, dystonia, migraine, Huntington’s disease, and dementia. For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit http://www.aan.com.

Fitness is important in dementia prevention. Click below for more info