Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Five New Trials Target Alzheimer’s Disease

Caregivers and healthcare professionals, here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle

Nancy Wurtzel
TIME magazine talked about some new research trials focusing on Alzheimer’s disease.  Intrigued, I visited their website to learn more.  You can read a very brief overview of each trial by going to the TIME website and reading, “5 Groundbreaking Trials are Testing Ways to Prevent Alzheimer’s.”
The headline is what caught my attention.  I love the words ‘groundbreaking’ and ‘prevent’ — especially when they are used in connection with Alzheimer’s disease or another type of dementia.
However, after reading about the research being conducted, I’m wasn’t sure I would use those two exact words.
Here’s the reason: Most of the trials detailed in the article will focus on amyloid, that nasty protein that builds up in the brain and causes a domino affect, eventually ravaging a person’s cognitive function.
As you probably know, Alzheimer’s researchers have been focusing on amyloid for many years but without success.
Among the scientific community, there isn’t even a consensus on whether amyloid is the root cause of the disease.  Many experts now believe it amyloid is only the by-product.
Even so, we have to keep the complicated wheels of research moving.  Why?  One or more of these research trials may result in some type of unexpected breakthrough.  Or, a combination of these studies could show definitively (and finally) that amyloid isn’t the culprit.  Ruling out one avenue of research leads to more doors opening.  We need to keep opening those doors.
The wheels of research move slowly, but at least they are moving.
When I picture the ‘Aha Alzheimer’s Research Moment,’ I see it happening accidentally.  A technician toiling away in a nondescript lab will accidentally stumble upon what proves to be a major development.  It’s happened before.  Many important medical discoveries have been revealed through a research misstep or purely by chance.
Wouldn’t that be incredible?

In the meantime, my message to the Alzheimer’s researchers, “Thank you for all your hard work and dedication to this cause.  You are heroes for fighting this terrible disease, and may you stumble upon an actual breakthrough real soon.”

 

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Discovery of new drug targets for memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease

Caregivers and healthcare professionals, here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two


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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle

Medical Xpress
 

Research team in Korea has discovered that reactive astrocytes, which have been commonly observed in Alzheimer's patients, aberrantly and abundantly produce the chief inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA and release it through the Best1 channel. The released GABA strongly inhibits neighboring neurons to cause impairment in synaptic transmission, plasticity and memory. This discovery will open a new chapter in the development of new drugs for treating such diseases.

 Alzheimer's disease, which is the most common cause of dementia, is fatal and currently, there is no cure. In Alzheimer's disease, brain cells are damaged and destroyed, leading to devastating memory loss. It is reported that 1 in 8 Americans aged 65 or over have Alzheimer's disease. In 2011, 7,600 elderly people with dementia lost their way back home and became homeless in Korea. However, to date, there has been no clear understanding of the mechanisms underlying dementia in Alzheimer's disease. So far, neuronal death is the only proposed mechanism available in scientific literature.

The research team led by Dr. C. Justin Lee at Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) and Dr. Daesoo Kim(KAIST) discovered that reactive astrocytes in the brains of Alzheimer's disease model mice produce the inhibitory transmitter GABA by the enzyme Monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) and release GABA through the Bestrophin-1 channel to suppress normal information flow during . Based on this discovery, the team was able to reduce the production and release of GABA by inhibiting MAO-B or Bestrophin-1, and successfully ameliorate impairments in , synaptic transmission and memory in Alzheimer's disease model mice.

In the behavioral test, the team used the fact that mice tend to prefer dark places. If a mouse experiences an electric shock in a dark place, it will remember this event and avoid dark places from then on. However, a mouse with modeled Alzheimer's disease cannot remember if such shock is related to dark places and keeps going back to dark places. The team demonstrated that treating these mice with a MAO-B inhibitor fully recovered the mice's memory. The selegiline is currently used in Parkinson's disease as an adjunct therapy and considered as a one of best promising medicine for MAO-B inhibitor. But it has been previously shown to be less effective in Alzheimer's

 

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Legalizing marijuana for Alzheimer's disease

Caregivers and healthcare professionals, here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle

Today only 4 percent of Alzheimer’s patients are 65 or younger, but as the baby boomer generation ages that number will dramatically increase. Five million older Americans suffer from the disease. It is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Unfortunately many older Americans will wonder why they should spend their golden years battling the illnesses or caring for someone who has it, when this is unnecessary because of the benefits boomers could gain in the treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease should they have access to legalized marijuana.
Scientists have made ground breaking discoveries in early detection of the disease but this does little for baby boomers who are working with older brains. Of the major deadly diseases in America, Alzheimer’s is the only illness that doctors have no way of slowing its progression, have no exact treatment that has had proven results, or a cure for the disease. When treating the disease doctors have to consider the age of the patient’s brain, according to Gary Wenk. Wenk is an expert on Alzheimer’s disease and inflammation of the brain. As a neuroscience professor at Ohio State he has studied extensively the effects of cannabis on the aging brain and inflammation. Using rats, he discovered that marijuana has positive impacts on cognitive health. “It’s worked in every rat we’ve given it to. We have some happy, intelligent old rats.”
Unfortunately that is the extent of the research. Studies like this are met with major challenges. Marijuana is legal in only two states. Cannabis is strictly prohibited in 25 states. In addition to that these studies are expensive. Professor Wenk was spending $150 per rat and spent $100,000 overall. The National Institute of Health spends far less on Alzheimer’s disease research than HIV/AIDS, cancer and heart disease research. In comparison $3-$6 billion is spent on each of the previously mentioned illnesses versus $480 million on Alzheimer’s research. Why support legal marijuana over medical marijuana for the treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease is a question that should be asked? With legal marijuana patients would not have to wait for the disease to develop in order to treat it. Legal marijuana also is heavily taxed by the government. This could indirectly create more funding for research and other programs that affect the aging population. While deaths from HIV/AIDS, cancer and heart disease decrease, deaths from Alzheimer’s disease continues to grow enormously.
Baby Boomers can change all of this. They are the demographic most heavily impacted by the illness and as half the voting population is over 45, they have the power to change the outcomes. Pined as the bell bottom wearing, war protesting pot smoking generation, it seems only natural they would be advocates of legalizing it. However, trends suggest that baby boomers are segregated. The younger generation was heavily influenced by Republican presidents Ronald Reagan and Gerald Ford. The oldest of the crowd have a tendency to lean more Democratic. Like all other generations they further differ in race, sex and socioeconomic status. This makes it hard to predict how they will behave in elections.
Perhaps one major unifying factor of this generation is community and the impact Alzheimer’s diseases will have on it. As the illness progresses it prevents seniors from enjoying the activities they participate in to remain a part of their communities. More and more seniors prefer to age at home. This is something that may not be possible when advanced dementia care is required. If baby boomers returned to their radical drug friendly roots it could open up a new level of funding for aging care, Alzheimer’s research and the treatment of the diseases that is hitting their community so hard. With these kinds of benefits it should be easy to see why legalizing marijuana would have such great benefits to baby boomers and the care they receive for Alzheimer’s Disease.
 
By Ashley Poag

 
 

Sunday, January 12, 2014

Best ways to relieve pain for those with dementia

Dementia healthcare professionals, other healthcare professionals and caregivers, here is some information you will find useful for clients and loved ones with dementia as well as others you might care for.
 
There are times when those with dementia may be in pain and they have trouble telling you, or are resistive to taking medication. One way to relieve their pain is to use  LGMedSupply Muscle Stimulators , Ultrasound Units and/or Tens Unit for relief of pain for you or for someone you care for who needs pain relief and/or rehabilitation. 
 
These devices are relatively easy to use, cost effective and do not require the patient or loved one swallow any pills which as you know can be difficult for a patient to take especially if they have dysphagia (swallowing difficulties).
 
LGMedical Supply Company is easy to deal with because they have a wide variety of the latest and greatest pain relieving supplies. They are always adding products because they have an excellent research and development team. They do not charge unreasonable rates and they are always having specials on their products. Besides this, they stand by their products, and they have an excellent customer service department. Employees of LGMedical are always willing to share product information so you can choose the right products for you, your clients or your loved one especially those with dementia.

Saturday, December 14, 2013

When do those with dementia need a nursing home-funny but true

Caregivers and healthcare professionals, here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle

aging care newsletter
When you get up in the morning feeling nothing but a sense of dread and gloom, it's time for a NH!
When your mom messes and pees on the floor more than the dog, it's time for a NH!
When strangling your parent suddenly seems like a good thing, it's time for a NH!
When you clean the kitchen, look back a few minutes later, do a double take and can't remember doing it because you're so exhausted from care giving, it's time for a NH!
When you're jekyll one minute and hyde the next, it's time for a NH!
If you start going outside and cussing like a sailor to relieve stress, praying the neighbors won't think you're nuts, it's time for a NH!
When YOU start to wonder if you're nuts, it's time for a NH!
When the doc says your blood pressure is through the roof and you're on your way to a stroke, it's time for a NH!
When AC is the only socializing you've done in years, it's time for a NH!
When you're wiping your elderly parents butt more than your own, it's time for a NH!
 

Thursday, October 24, 2013

For Elderly with Dementia, Better Eating Slows Depression, Improves BMI

Caregivers and healthcare professionals, here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition

MPR
 
(HealthDay News) – For elderly adults with dementia, symptoms of depression can be improved through nutritional improvement interventions, according to a study published in the Journal of Advanced Nursing.
Hua-Shan Wu, PhD, RN, from Chung Shan Medical University in Taiwan, and Li-Chan Lin, PhD, RN, from National Yang-Ming University in Taiwan tested the effectiveness of a combination of methods to teach eating procedures to elderly adults (mean age, 82.8 years) with dementia. A group of 25 participants received fixed spaced retrieval memory training combined with Montessori-based activities over 24 sessions, through which structured activities relating to daily life were sequentially and repetitively practiced. The same intervention was delivered to 38 participants in an individualized group, which made adjustments for each participant's learning response. A routine care group included 27 participants. At the pre-test, posttest, and at one, three, and six months of follow-up, body mass index was recorded and participants were scored according to the Chinese version of the Mini-Nutritional Assessment and Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia.
The researchers found that, over time, the Mini-Nutritional Assessment scores and body mass index of the fixed and individualized groups increased significantly. As a result of the improvement in the Mini-Nutritional Assessment scores arising from the individualized intervention, the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia scores were significantly reduced.
"Individualized spaced retrieval combined with Montessori-based activities produced nutritional improvements that could moderate depressive symptoms in residents with dementia," write the authors.

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Alzheimer's update

Caregivers and healthcare professionals, here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle

Time to Step Up




Over the years we've accomplished so many things together: Passage of the National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) (P.L. 111-375), the unveiling of the first-ever National Alzheimer’s Plan, enhancements to government benefits programs for individuals with Alzheimer's, introduction of critical legislation, and increased federal funding for Alzheimer’s research in the midst of challenging budgetary times. In the past year alone we've seen a host of new bipartisan co-sponsors for the HOPE for Alzheimer's Act, new members of the Congressional Task Force on Alzheimer’s Disease, dozens of town hall events, thousands of in-person meetings with elected officials, and a growing recognition of the Alzheimer's crisis among federal officials. 

By reaching out to your elected officials, via the phone and through our action alerts & petitions you've created change and made a difference in the lives of those affected by this devastating disease. You’ve repeatedly demonstrated your commitment to conquering Alzheimer's. Isn’t it time members of Congress did the same?
Tell Congress To Support Alzheimer’s Caregivers. Urge your members of Congress to support the HOPE for Alzheimer’s Act.
The Health Outcomes, Planning, and Education (HOPE) for Alzheimer's Act (S.709/H.R. 1507) will improve diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and increase access to information on care and support for newly diagnosed individuals and their families. An early and documented diagnosis when coupled with access to care planning services leads to better outcomes for individuals with Alzheimer’s as well as their caregivers. Tell your member of Congress that families living with this devastating disease need HOPE!
Save the Date!
Mark your calendars now for the 2014 Alzheimer’s Association Advocacy Forum, taking place April 7-9 in Washington D.C. The Association’s 26th annual Forum includes the National Alzheimer's Dinner, an excellent opportunity for advocates to celebrate another exemplary year of advocacy, growing awareness and leadership in advancing Alzheimer's research and support.  Visit alz.org/forum/ to learn more about the Advocacy Forum.Advocate Mobile App on iPhoneHave you downloaded our ALZ Advocacy mobile app yet? Visit alz.org/advocateapp on your iPhone or Android device

Fitness is important in dementia prevention. Click below for more info