Thursday, December 13, 2012

Diabetes Drug May Restore Memory In Alzheimer's



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Medical News Today

Researchers in Canada have discovered a drug originally intended for the treatment of diabetes may restore memory in brain cells affected by Alzheimer's disease. In tests on animal brain cells, they found that AC253, a diabetes drug that never made it to market, restored memory to levels similar to those of normal cells. Trials could start in five years, should further tests succeed, says the team.

The researchers write about their work in a paper published online in The Journal of Neuroscience on 28 November.

In a statement released on Tuesday, senior author Jack Jhamandas, a researcher with the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry at the University of Alberta, says their discovery is "very important" because:

"... it tells us that drugs like this might be able to restore memory, even after Alzheimer's disease may have set in."

Estimates suggest in the next 30 years, 1,125,000 Canadians will be diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.

Cells of people with Alzheimer's contain amyloid protein, which is found in particularly large amounts in cells from the memory and cognition parts of the brain. It is the presence of this protein that is believed to impair memory.

Last year, Jhamandas and his team showed that AC253 could block the toxic effects of amyloid protein that lead to brain-cell death.

For this latest study, they tested: read all about a 
Diabetes Drug May Restore Memory In Alzheimer's

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